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Flap Procedure for Gum Disease

You may need surgery for severe gum disease (periodontitis) if it cannot be cured with antibiotics or root planing and scaling. A flap procedure cleans the roots of a tooth and repairs bone damage caused by gum disease. A gum specialist (periodontist) or an oral surgeon often performs the procedure.

Before the procedure, you will be given a local anesthetic to numb the area where the doctor will work on your gums.

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The doctor will pull back a section of your gums to clean the roots of your teeth and repair damaged bone, if needed. The gum flap will be sewn back into place and covered with gauze to stop the bleeding.

Bone may be:

  • Smoothed and reshaped so that plaque has fewer places to grow.
  • Repaired (grafted) with bone from another part of the body or with man-made materials. The doctor may place a lining on the bone graft to help the bone grow back. The lining may need to be removed later.

What To Expect After Surgery

Typically it takes only a few days to recover from a flap procedure. Be sure to follow the home care instructions that your dentist or oral surgeon gives you. If you have questions about your instructions, call the dentist or surgeon. The following are general suggestions to help speed recovery:

  • Take painkillers as prescribed.
  • After 24 hours, you can rinse your mouth gently with warm salt water several times a day to reduce swelling and relieve pain.
  • Change gauze pads before they become soaked with blood.
  • Relax after surgery. Strenuous physical activity may increase bleeding.
  • Eat soft foods such as gelatin, pudding, or light soup. Gradually add solid foods to your diet as the area heals.
  • Do not lie flat. This may prolong bleeding. Prop up your head with pillows.
  • Continue to carefully brush your teeth and tongue.
  • Apply an ice or cold pack to the outside of your mouth to help relieve pain and swelling.
  • Do not use sucking motions, such as when using a straw to drink.
  • Do not smoke.

A few days after the procedure, your dentist will remove the stitches.

Why It Is Done

The flap procedure is necessary when severe gum disease (periodontitis) has damaged the bones that support your teeth.

How Well It Works

If you maintain good dental care after the surgery, the flap procedure should help stop your gum disease. Your gums should become pink and healthy again.

Risks

The roots of your teeth may become more sensitive.

The contour or shape of your gums may change.

Gum surgery can introduce harmful bacteria into the bloodstream. Gum tissue is also at risk of infection. You may need to take antibiotics before and after surgery if you have a condition that puts you at high risk for a severe infection or if infections are particularly dangerous for you. You may need to take antibiotics if you:

  • Have certain heart problems that make it dangerous for you to get a heart infection called endocarditis.
  • Have an impaired immune system.
  • Had recent major surgeries or have man-made body parts, such as an artificial hip or heart valve.

What To Think About

  • A flap procedure is often needed to save teeth that are supported by a bone damaged by gum disease.
  • Gum disease usually will come back if you do not brush and floss regularly after surgery.
  • To promote healing, stop all use of tobacco. Smoking or using spit tobacco decreases your ability to fight infection of your gums and delays healing. To learn more, see the topic Quitting Smoking.
  • You will need to see your dentist regularly so that he or she can follow your progress. If your gum disease spreads, you may lose teeth.

Complete the surgery information form (PDF)(What is a PDF document?) to help you prepare for this surgery.

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Steven K. Patterson, BS, DDS, MPH - Dentistry
Last Revised August 5, 2011

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: August 05, 2011
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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