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Denture Problems

Dentures can be an important solution to tooth loss. Today's dentures, also called false teeth, are not like the ones your grandmother wore. They are more comfortable and natural looking than they were in the past. Still, if you don't take proper care of your dentures, problems can occur.

WebMD takes a look at common denture problems and how they can be treated or prevented.

Common Denture Problems

If you wear dentures, it is very important you keep your mouth clean and healthy. You should also only wear dentures that fit properly. Otherwise, the following problems may occur:

  • Gum and mouth irritation
  • Problems eating and speaking
  • Dentures that move around in your mouth
  • Mouth infections

 

Treating Denture Problems

If you have problems with your dentures, see your dentist right away. Your dentures may need to be adjusted or replaced.

Here are some ways to treat various denture problems:

Make sure your dentures fit. Over time, your gums and bones will change and your dentures won't fit as well. When this happens, your dentures need to be adjusted, modified, or replaced by your dentist. Never try to adjust your dentures yourself.

Speak slowly. When you first get dentures, it may be hard for you to say certain words. Be patient. Practice saying the challenging words aloud and speak slowly. If your dentures move around when you laugh or smile, gently bite down and swallow to put them back in place. Check with your dentist to adjust the fit.

Eat soft foods. If you are having trouble eating, follow these tips:

  • Take small bites of soft foods, such as eggs and yogurt.
  • Don't eat anything sticky.
  • Chew your food slowly.
  • When you chew, use both sides of your mouth at the same time. This prevents your dentures from moving forward or tipping.

Eating will become easier as you get used to your dentures. In time, you should be able to eat most foods.

Use an adhesive. Denture adhesives help your dentures stay in place and make them feel more secure. But denture adhesives should not be used to fix old or poorly fitting dentures. When using an adhesive, follow the instructions carefully. Use only a small amount.

Mouth Infections Linked to Dentures

Some people who wear dentures get mouth infections, such as:

Cheilitis. This is a painful infection that causes inflammation and cracking at the corners of your mouth. It is caused by an overgrowth of yeast. Yeast can accumulate in moist areas of your mouth if your dentures don't fit properly.

To prevent cheilitis (also called cheilosis), see your dentist regularly to make sure your dentures fit properly. Also, try not to rub or lick the corners of your mouth.

Stomatitis. This is another infection that is caused by too much yeast. You may not know you have denture-induced stomatitis, because symptoms are not always obvious. When symptoms are noticeable, you may see small red bumps on the roof of your mouth or general mouth redness, especially under your upper dentures.

Both cheilitis and stomatitis can be treated with medicine and proper denture care.

WebMD Medical Reference

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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