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Oral Care

Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

  1. Dental Care: Brushing and Flossing Your Teeth

    Your teeth can last a lifetime if you practice basic dental care, which involves brushing and flossing regularly, eating a mouth - healthy diet, and visiting your dentist and/or dental hygienist for regular checkups and cleanings. Developing good dental health habits is the best way to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. What are good brushing and flossing? Why are brushing and flossing important

  2. Basic Dental Care - Health Tools

    Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. Effective tooth brushing and flossing ...

  3. Basic Dental Care - Home Treatment

    Developing good dental health habits is the best way to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Older adults may have special concerns about dentures, and those with arthritis may have trouble holding a toothbrush. Effective brushing and flossingBrush after eatingGet into a routine of brushing and flossing. Brush after meals and snacks and before bed.Use a toothbrush with soft, rounded - end bristles

  4. Basic Dental Care - Infants and Children

    A child's dental care really starts with his or her mother's healthy pregnancy, because baby teeth begin to form before birth. If you are pregnant, make sure to eat a balanced, nutritious diet and get an adequate amount of vitamins and minerals. It's important for pregnant women to have a complete dental exam and have any cavities or gum disease treated. For more information, see the topic ...

  5. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - Medications

    For tooth pain due to newly installed or adjusted braces for malocclusion, take regular doses of nonprescription pain medication, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, for 3 to 5 days.

  6. Extracting Teeth for Malocclusion Treatment - Topic Overview

    Serial extraction is the carefully planned and selective removal of baby ( primary ) teeth to create room for incoming permanent ( secondary ) teeth. The reason dentists or orthodontists consider removing teeth is because after age 8,the space for a child's teeth (arch length) doesn't increase. 1 Severe crowding of teeth at this age means that permanent teeth are likely to come in out of ...

  7. When to Treat Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    Many treatment options are available for malocclusion ("poor bite"),and expert opinions differ about timing. Your dentist or orthodontist may give you a choice between early or later treatment or may prefer one particular approach. However,consider these points: An underdeveloped lower jaw (mandible) is best treated as soon as a child is old enough to cooperate with treatment (age 5 or ...

  8. Sucking and Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    Thumb-sucking,finger-sucking,and pacifier use can cause malocclusion (poor bite) in young children. But when a child stops the sucking habit,the teeth naturally begin moving back to their normal positions. Infants are born with a natural sucking reflex,and it's common for this reflex to evolve into a comforting behavior. But thumb- and finger-sucking and pacifier use for more than 4 to 6 ...

  9. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - Surgery

    Surgery to create better alignment between an adult's upper and lower jaw is sometimes combined with orthodontic treatment for malocclusion.

  10. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - Exams and Tests

    During routine dental visits, your dentist typically looks for developing malocclusion. Talk with your dentist about any oral habits (such as a child's use of a pacifier) or difficulties with speech, chewing, or pain. Your dentist may suggest an orthodont

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Answer:
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Good
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Better
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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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