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    Oral Care

    Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

    1. Basic Dental Care - Infants and Children

      A child's dental care really starts with his or her mother's healthy pregnancy, because baby teeth begin to form before birth. If you are pregnant, make sure to eat a balanced, nutritious diet and get an adequate amount of vitamins and minerals. It's important for pregnant women to have a complete dental exam and have any cavities or gum disease treated. For more information, see the topic ...

    2. Mouth and Dental Injuries - Topic Overview

      A partially blocked airway is often the cause of mouth breathing,usually due to allergies or enlarged adenoids or tonsils. A doctor should evaluate any of these conditions. Frequent mouth breathing can cause dry,red,swollen gums. This can be especially noticeable around erupting baby and permanent teeth. In children younger than 8,about half do some breathing through their mouths,...

    3. Flap Procedure for Gum Disease

      You may need surgery for severe gum disease (periodontitis) if it cannot be cured with antibiotics or root planing and scaling. A flap procedure cleans the roots of a tooth and repairs bone damage caused by gum disease.

    4. Tooth Extraction for Gum Disease

      Tooth extraction is done when gum disease has loosened or severely damaged a tooth. In most cases, a dentist can pull (extract) your tooth.

    5. Canker Sores - Health Tools

      An interactive tool about surgery for temporomandibular disorder.

    6. Basic Dental Care - Home Treatment

      Developing good dental health habits is the best way to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Older adults may have special concerns about dentures, and those with arthritis may have trouble holding a toothbrush. Effective brushing and flossingBrush after eatingGet into a routine of brushing and flossing. Brush after meals and snacks and before bed.Use a toothbrush with soft, rounded - end bristles

    7. Tonsillectomy

      A tonsillectomy is the surgical removal of the tonsils. The adenoids may or may not be removed at the same time. Adenoidectomy is not discussed in this topic.

    8. Basic Dental Care - Topic Overview

      You can use biofeedback to help reduce temporomandibular (TM) disorder -related muscle tension. Biofeedback uses equipment that monitors muscle tension or skin temperature. Electrodes,which detect electrical current produced by muscle contraction,are placed on jaw muscles. If you clench your teeth or have poor posture,the biofeedback machine produces a signal,such as an upward-pointing ...

    9. Mouth and Dental Injuries - Topic Overview

      To help prevent or treat a temporomandibular disorder (TMD), you can try gentle jaw exercises. You can also try techniques that help you relax your jaw muscles.ExerciseTry a gentle exercise to restore normal range of motion, improve flexibility, and strengthen the jaw muscles. Your doctor, dentist, or physical therapist can recommend additional exercises.Do not do this exercise when your pain is severe or if it makes your pain worse.While watching yourself in a mirror, gently open and close your mouth, dropping your jaw straight up and down.Repeat for a few minutes each morning and night.Look for small improvements in the jaw's range of motion as you practice this exercise from day to day.RelaxationPaying attention to how you use your jaw can both prevent and help relieve symptoms. Good habits that help relax and rest your jaw include: Keep your teeth apart and your lips closed.Keep your tongue on the roof of your mouth, not between your teeth.Avoid things that make your jaw

    10. Tooth Decay - Topic Overview

      Mouth sores may make eating and talking painful. The most common mouth sores are cold sores and canker sores. In severe cases of canker sores,a doctor may prescribe a medicine to ease inflammation and pain. Other possible causes of mouth sores include: Impetigo. Symptoms may include oozing,honey-colored,crusty sores that appear on the face,usually between the upper lip and nose. Impetigo ...

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    How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

    Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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