Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Oral Care

Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

  1. Tooth Decay - Topic Overview

    Is this topic for you?This topic provides information on tooth decay and cavities. If you are looking for information on: Gum disease, see the topic Gum Disease. Toothaches, see the topic Toothache and Gum Problems. Dental checkups and how to care for your teeth, see the topic Basic Dental Care. What is tooth decay?Tooth decay is damage that occurs when germs (bacteria) in your mouth make acids that eat away at a tooth. It can lead to a hole in the tooth, called a cavity. If not treated, tooth decay can cause pain, infection, and tooth loss. A tooth has three layers. The hard outer layer is called enamel. The middle layer is called dentin. The center of the tooth is called the pulp. It contains nerves and blood vessels. The more layers that are affected by decay, the worse the damage. What causes tooth decay?Bacteria and food can cause tooth decay. A clear, sticky substance called plaque is always forming on your teeth and gums. Plaque contains bacteria that feed on the sugars in

  2. Treatment for Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    Orthognathic surgery treats malocclusion ("poor bite") by restructuring the jaw through cutting the bone and repositioning the bone segments. Adults who have jaw-related malocclusion are sometimes offered a choice between simple orthodontic treatment and orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery. Adults who have severe jaw problems may need surgery to improve their looks and how ...

  3. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - What Increases Your Risk

    Factors that increase the risk of developing malocclusion include a family history of malocclusion and some oral habits, such as thumb-sucking.

  4. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - Symptoms

    Learn the symptoms of malocclusion.

  5. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - Medications

    For tooth pain due to newly installed or adjusted braces for malocclusion, take regular doses of nonprescription pain medication, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, for 3 to 5 days.

  6. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - Cause

    Malocclusion (poor bite) is usually caused by problems in the shape or size of the jaw or teeth. If children have a small jaw, their teeth may grow into a space that is too small.

  7. When to Treat Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    Many treatment options are available for malocclusion ("poor bite"),and expert opinions differ about timing. Your dentist or orthodontist may give you a choice between early or later treatment or may prefer one particular approach. However,consider these points: An underdeveloped lower jaw (mandible) is best treated as soon as a child is old enough to cooperate with treatment (age 5 or ...

  8. Mouth Breathing and Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    A partially blocked airway is often the cause of mouth breathing,usually due to allergies or enlarged adenoids or tonsils. A doctor should evaluate any of these conditions. Frequent mouth breathing can cause dry,red,swollen gums. This can be especially noticeable around erupting baby and permanent teeth. In children younger than 8,about half do some breathing through their mouths,...

  9. Types of Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    The term "malocclusion" (poor bite) refers to a number of possible conditions. The most common are: Upper protrusion. In an upper protrusion,the upper front teeth are pushed outward (buck teeth). A small lower jaw may be the cause. Pacifier use or thumb-sucking can also create this condition by pushing the teeth outward,sometimes causing the roof of the mouth to change shape (upper palate). ...

  10. Malocclusion and Orthodontics - Other Treatment

    Learn about restorative dentistry -- crowns -- as an option for treating malocclusion.

Displaying 161 - 170 of 343 Articles << Prev Page 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Next >>

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

Get the latest Oral Health newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Never
(0)
Good
(1-3)
Better
(4-6)
Best
(7)

You are currently

Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

close up of woman sticking out tongue
Sores, discoloration, bumps and more.
toothbrushes
10 secrets to a brighter smile.
 
Veneer smile
Before and after.
Woman checking her bite in mirror
Why dental care is important.
 

Woman dissatisfied with granola bar
Slideshow
woman with jaw pain
Quiz
 
eroded front teeth
Slideshow
brushing teeth
Video
 

Variety shades of tea
Slideshow
mouth and dental instruments
Article
 
Closeup of a happy young guy brushing his teeth
Tool
womans smile
Video