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    Oral Care

    Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

    1. Mouth and Dental Injuries - Topic Overview

      Serial extraction is the carefully planned and selective removal of baby ( primary ) teeth to create room for incoming permanent ( secondary ) teeth. The reason dentists or orthodontists consider removing teeth is because after age 8,the space for a child's teeth (arch length) doesn't increase. 1 Severe crowding of teeth at this age means that permanent teeth are likely to come in out of ...

    2. Canker Sores - Topic Overview

      As a treatment for temporomandibular (TM) disorder,hypnosis may help you relax your facial and jaw muscles and break unconscious tooth-grinding and jaw-clenching habits. Under the guidance of a trained psychotherapist,you are guided into a calm,focused,relaxed state of body and mind (trance state). Once this state is achieved,you may be more susceptible to the power of motivational ...

    3. Basic Dental Care - Routine Checkups

      See your dentist once or twice a year. Your dentist will examine your teeth and gums for signs of tooth decay, gum disease, and other health problems. Your dental hygienist will begin to clean your teeth by scraping hard mineral buildup (tartar) off of your teeth with a small metal tool. Then the hygienist will floss your teeth, use a polishing compound, and apply fluoride. Cleanings usually ...

    4. Basic Dental Care - Topic Overview

      Is this topic for you?This topic provides information on tooth decay and cavities. If you are looking for information on: Gum disease, see the topic Gum Disease. Toothaches, see the topic Toothache and Gum Problems. Dental checkups and how to care for your teeth, see the topic Basic Dental Care. What is tooth decay?Tooth decay is damage that occurs when germs (bacteria) in your mouth make acids that eat away at a tooth. It can lead to a hole in the tooth, called a cavity. If not treated, tooth decay can cause pain, infection, and tooth loss. A tooth has three layers. The hard outer layer is called enamel. The middle layer is called dentin. The center of the tooth is called the pulp. It contains nerves and blood vessels. The more layers that are affected by decay, the worse the damage. What causes tooth decay?Bacteria and food can cause tooth decay. A clear, sticky substance called plaque is always forming on your teeth and gums. Plaque contains bacteria that feed on the sugars in

    5. Canker Sores - Topic Overview

      Everyone gets a bad taste in the mouth from time to time. Try the following simple home treatment measures to improve the taste in your mouth: Gargle with water. Brush your teeth,tongue,roof of your mouth,and gums using toothpaste. Rinse your mouth with mouthwash. Drink liquids,chew sugar-free gum or mints,or suck on sour candies. Use plastic utensils if you have a bitter or metallic ...

    6. Mouth and Dental Injuries - Topic Overview

      If a temporomandibular (TM) disorder is suspected,your dentist or primary care doctor will ask you to describe: Your jaw pain,including how long you have had it,whether you wake up with sore,stiff jaw muscles,and where you feel pain. Any recent change in the way your teeth fit together. Daily habits that may promote jaw pain-for example,whether your pain gets worse when you clench your ...

    7. Strep Throat - Symptoms

      Learn the symptoms of tonsillitis.

    8. Taste Changes - Topic Overview

      Is this topic for you?This topic provides information on basic dental care. If you are looking for information on tooth decay or cavities, see the topic Tooth Decay. If you are looking for information on gum disease (periodontal disease), see the topic Gum Disease.What is basic dental care?Basic dental care involves brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, seeing your dentist and/or dental ...

    9. Jaw Problems: Exercise and Relaxation - Topic Overview

      Changes in your diet can reduce the mechanical stress on your temporomandibular (TM) joint and may help relieve your jaw pain. Avoid hard or chewy foods (such as popcorn,jerky,tough meats,chewy breads,gum,and raw apples and carrots) that cause your jaws to work overtime. Choose softer foods that are easy to chew,such as eggs,casseroles,yogurt,and soup. Cut your food into small,...

    10. Mouth Problems, Noninjury - Frequently Asked Questions

      Learning about gum disease:What is gum disease?Getting treatment:Which antibiotics are used to treat gum disease?How is root planing and scaling done?How is gingivectomy done?How is a flap procedure done?How does a dentist remove a tooth?Living with gum disease:How should I care for my teeth when I have gum disease?

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    How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

    Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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