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    Oral Care

    Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

    1. Mouth Problems, Noninjury - Topic Overview

      All of a child's 20 primary (baby) teeth usually break through the gums (erupt) between the ages of 6 months and 3 years. Then the permanent teeth begin to emerge, usually starting at about age 6. Your child probably had his or her first trip to the dentist between 6 and 12 months of age, and now you probably have regular appointments set up. If for some reason your child has not yet seen a dentist, make an appointment for an exam.Your 3- to 6-year-old child will be busily developing language skills and exploring the ever-widening world. Hard as it is to get a preschooler to sit still, this is the age during which you can teach good dental health habits.Your child can learn how to brush his or her own teeth at about 3 years of age and should be brushing his or her own teeth, morning and night, by age 4. You should still supervise and check for proper cleaning.Give your child a small, soft toothbrush, and apply fluoridated toothpaste in an amount about the size of a small green pea.

    2. Mouth Problems, Noninjury - Topic Overview

      A visit to the dentist can be a scary thing for children. The odors,the tools,the sounds,and the big person with the mask can all upset a child. When choosing a dentist for your child and preparing him or her for a visit,think about the following to make the visit as pleasant as possible. Choosing a dentist Pediatric dentists specialize in the care of infants',children's,and teenagers' ...

    3. Jaw Problems: Exercise and Relaxation - Topic Overview

      Tooth decay, called dental caries, is caused by bacteria eating away the outer protective layer (enamel) of a tooth. Help prevent tooth decay in young children by adopting the following healthy habits:Take good care of your own teeth and gums. Saliva contains bacteria that cause tooth decay. Keep your own teeth and mouth healthy so you are less likely to transfer these bacteria to your baby. Avoid sharing spoons and other utensils with your baby. Also, don't clean your baby's pacifier with your mouth.Prevent prolonged contact with sugars in formula and breast milk. Remove a bottle from your baby's mouth before he or she falls asleep. This practice helps prevent mouth bacteria from producing acids that cause baby bottle tooth decay. Also, clean your baby's teeth after feeding, especially at night. Be smart about juice. Juice is not part of a healthy diet. Compared to a piece of fruit, fruit juice doesn't have the valuable fiber, it usually has more calories, and it is absorbed

    4. Canker Sores - Topic Overview

      In some cases of malocclusion (poor bite),bone movement is needed to put the jaw in the right position. This process is called "bone remodeling." As braces slowly move the teeth,the surrounding bone starts growing cells that become new bone. The braces make sure that the new bone forms in the right place for better jaw movement. ...

    5. Canker Sores - Topic Overview

      Home treatment may be all that is needed for a black or coated tongue. Brush your tongue daily with a soft-bristled toothbrush and toothpaste or a solution of 1 part hydrogen peroxide to 2 parts water. Scrape the tongue with an upside-down teaspoon to remove the furlike coating on the tongue. Do not use tobacco products. Bismuth products,such as Pepto-Bismol,can turn your tongue black. The ...

    6. Jaw Problems: Exercise and Relaxation - Topic Overview

      There is a strong relationship between stress, muscle tension, and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). An overstressed mind can lead to an overstressed body. Excessive tension in your jaw muscles can force your jaw joint to move in an unnatural manner. Over time, you may damage the disc that cushions the TM joint, or you may wear down some of your teeth, forcing your jaw into an unnatural position.Manage stressLearn to recognize when stress is affecting your life, and find ways to relieve it. Exercise is an excellent way for your body to process stress in a healthy way.Relaxation skills and activities can make a big difference in how stress affects your body and mind.For tips, see the topic Stress Management. Also see the topic Mental Health Problems and Mind-Body Wellness.Emotional stress can be the result of:Sudden changes in your life, such as the loss of a loved one. Stress can also accompany positive changes, such as starting a new job.Problems at home or at work.Worrying about

    7. Canker Sores - How Well It Works

      Most people who have this surgery recover with no problems. ...

    8. Jaw Problems: Exercise and Relaxation - Home Treatment

      Developing good dental health habits is the best way to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Older adults may have special concerns about dentures, and those with arthritis may have trouble holding a toothbrush. Effective brushing and flossingBrush after eatingGet into a routine of brushing and flossing. Brush after meals and snacks and before bed.Use a toothbrush with soft, rounded - end bristles

    9. Jaw Problems: Exercise and Relaxation - Topic Overview

      To help prevent or treat a temporomandibular disorder (TMD), you can try gentle jaw exercises. You can also try techniques that help you relax your jaw muscles.ExerciseTry a gentle exercise to restore normal range of motion, improve flexibility, and strengthen the jaw muscles. Your doctor, dentist, or physical therapist can recommend additional exercises.Do not do this exercise when your pain is severe or if it makes your pain worse.While watching yourself in a mirror, gently open and close your mouth, dropping your jaw straight up and down.Repeat for a few minutes each morning and night.Look for small improvements in the jaw's range of motion as you practice this exercise from day to day.RelaxationPaying attention to how you use your jaw can both prevent and help relieve symptoms. Good habits that help relax and rest your jaw include: Keep your teeth apart and your lips closed.Keep your tongue on the roof of your mouth, not between your teeth.Avoid things that make your jaw

    10. Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) - Topic Overview

      If a temporomandibular (TM) disorder is suspected,your dentist or primary care doctor will ask you to describe: Your jaw pain,including how long you have had it,whether you wake up with sore,stiff jaw muscles,and where you feel pain. Any recent change in the way your teeth fit together. Daily habits that may promote jaw pain-for example,whether your pain gets worse when you clench your ...

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    How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

    Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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