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Oral Care

Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

  1. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Learn the facts about cleft lip and cleft palate, a common birth defect, from the experts at WebMD.

  2. Controlling Dental Pain

    The dentist office makes many people anxious. Learn the various techniques for controlling anxiety and pain during your dental procedure.

  3. Air Abrasion: Dental Care Without the Drill

    Learn about air abrasion, a technique some dentists use to remove tooth decay without a drill.

  4. Caring for Teeth With Braces and Retainers

    Get tips on caring for teeth with braces and retainers.

  5. 9 Risk Factors for Tooth Loss

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  6. Caring for Dentures

    Learn how to properly care for dentures from the experts at WebMD.

  7. Picture of the Tongue

    WebMD's Tongue Anatomy Page provides a detailed picture and definition of the tongue as well as an overview of its function and location in the body. Also learn about conditions, test, and procedures that may affect the tongue.

  8. Arthroscopy for Temporomandibular Disorders

    For arthroscopic jaw surgery, the surgeon inserts a pencil-thin, lighted tube (arthroscope) into the jaw joint through a small incision in the skin. The arthroscope is connected to a small camera outside the body that transmits a close-up image.

  9. Strep Throat Complications - Topic Overview

    Complications of strep throat are rare but can occur,especially if strep throat is not properly treated with antibiotics. Complications can be related either to the strep infection or to the body's immune response to the infection. Complications related to the strep infection Although rare,complications can result from the strep infection spreading to other areas of the body. Infection can ...

  10. Jaw Problems: Managing Stress - Topic Overview

    There is a strong relationship between stress, muscle tension, and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). An overstressed mind can lead to an overstressed body. Excessive tension in your jaw muscles can force your jaw joint to move in an unnatural manner. Over time, you may damage the disc that cushions the TM joint, or you may wear down some of your teeth, forcing your jaw into an unnatural position.Manage stressLearn to recognize when stress is affecting your life, and find ways to relieve it. Exercise is an excellent way for your body to process stress in a healthy way.Relaxation skills and activities can make a big difference in how stress affects your body and mind.For tips, see the topic Stress Management. Also see the topic Mental Health Problems and Mind-Body Wellness.Emotional stress can be the result of:Sudden changes in your life, such as the loss of a loved one. Stress can also accompany positive changes, such as starting a new job.Problems at home or at work.Worrying about

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Answer:
Never
(0)
Good
(1-3)
Better
(4-6)
Best
(7)

You are currently

Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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