Skip to content

Oral Care

Is Mercury in Fillings Really a Problem?

Font Size
A
A
A

WebMD Health News

May 29, 2001 -- Chances are, you have had a tooth cavity that needed to be filled. It's a pretty common occurrence. But how often have you have stopped to wonder what those fillings contain -- and what you carry around in your mouth for decades?

According to the American Dental Association, or ADA, up to 76% of dentists use silver fillings containing mercury when filling a tooth. Although the substance used for silver fillings, known as amalgam, has been in use for more than 100 years, the fillings are controversial because of claims that exposure to the vapor from the mercury can cause a variety of health problems ranging from joint pain to multiple sclerosis.

The ADA maintains the fillings are safe and says studies have failed to find any link between silver fillings containing mercury and any medical disorder.

And the ADA is not alone in its position. The CDC, the World Health Organization, the FDA, and others support the use of silver fillings as safe, durable, and cost-effective. The U.S. Public Health Service has said there is no health reason not to use silver fillings, unless a patient has an allergy to a component in the amalgam. The ADA says fewer than 100 incidents of such allergy have ever been reported.

But Bill DeLong, DDS, a dentist in Ellicott City, Md., says the ADA's claim that the mercury in silver fillings doesn't cause health problems is "bogus."

DeLong, who does not use silver fillings, has been brought before his state dental board twice for talking to patients about the safety precautions he uses in his office -- including a mercury vapor detector -- when removing fillings for people who want or need them replaced.

"I had complaints ... about the fact that I discuss that with patients -- and in both instances they tried to either confiscate my instruments or get me to not discuss anything with my patients unless they bring it up first," says DeLong, one of five dentists who are suing in federal court for the right to discuss the potential harm of mercury in fillings or even post information in their offices informing patients of some of the studies that have linked the fillings to health problems.

1 | 2 | 3

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

Get the latest Oral Health newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Never
(0)
Good
(1-3)
Better
(4-6)
Best
(7)

You are currently

Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

close up of woman sticking out tongue
Sores, discoloration, bumps and more.
toothbrushes
10 secrets to a brighter smile.
 
Veneer smile
Before and after.
Woman checking her bite in mirror
Why dental care is important.
 

Woman dissatisfied with granola bar
Slideshow
woman with jaw pain
Quiz
 
eroded front teeth
Slideshow
brushing teeth
Video
 

Variety shades of tea
Slideshow
mouth and dental instruments
Article
 
Closeup of a happy young guy brushing his teeth
Tool
womans smile
Video