Skip to content

Oral Care

FDA: Mercury Fillings Not Harmful

FDA Rules Mercury in Dental Fillings Doesn't Cause Harm, but Tightens Controls
Font Size
A
A
A

FDA's Final Rule on Amalgams continued...

Included in the final regulation is the decision to classify dental amalgam as a Class II or moderate risk device, giving the FDA authority to impose special controls with the goal of ensuring safety and effectiveness.

The special controls are spelled out in a guidance document that includes recommendations on labeling and other parameters. Among the labeling recommendations:

•         A warning against the use of the filling material in those with a known mercury allergy

•         A warning to dentists and other dental professionals to use adequate ventilation when handling the dental amalgam

•         A statement talking about the risk and benefit of the dental amalgams, including the risks of inhaled mercury vapor. The statement is meant to help patients and dentists make informed decisions.

Previously, the FDA had classified the two separate parts of the amalgam, including elemental mercury and the metal powder alloy. Now the product is purchased in a different form than in previous years, Runner says. ''Many years ago, dentists would purchase the alloy and the mercury separately and mix it in the office."

These days, she says, they purchase it in an encapsulated form. "That was the form not classified before," she says.

FDA Ruling: Reactions

In a statement issued Tuesday, the American Dental Association said: "The American Dental Association (ADA) agrees with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) decision not to place any restriction on the use of dental amalgam, a commonly used cavity-filling material."

Leaving the decision up to patients and their dentists is the correct approach, according to the ADA. "The FDA has left the decision about dental treatment right where it needs to be -- between the dentist and the patient," ADA President John Findley, DDS, says in the statement.

Not everyone agrees, however. ''The final rule is an outrage," says Charles Brown, national counsel for Consumers for Dental Choice, a group against the use of mercury amalgams. ''It puts mercury 1 inch from a child's brain. It puts mercury directly to the fetus.''

Ideally, he says, the agency should have warned against the filling use for children, pregnant women, and nursing mothers.

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

Get the latest Oral Health newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Never
(0)
Good
(1-3)
Better
(4-6)
Best
(7)

You are currently

Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

close up of woman sticking out tongue
Sores, discoloration, bumps and more.
toothbrushes
10 secrets to a brighter smile.
 
Veneer smile
Before and after.
Woman checking her bite in mirror
Why dental care is important.
 

Woman dissatisfied with granola bar
Slideshow
woman with jaw pain
Quiz
 
eroded front teeth
Slideshow
brushing teeth
Video
 

Variety shades of tea
Slideshow
mouth and dental instruments
Article
 
Closeup of a happy young guy brushing his teeth
Tool
womans smile
Video