Skip to content

Mouth Myths and Facts Quiz

  1 of  
Current Score:  
Loading..Please Wait
slide image

The more sugar you eat, the more cavities you get.

slide image

The more sugar you eat, the more cavities you get.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

When it comes to causing cavities, how long sugar has contact with your teeth is more important than how much sugar you eat. Sugar produces acid that eats away at tooth enamel. The longer sugar is in your mouth, the more acid forms, and the longer your teeth are exposed to it.

slide image

Sugar-free soda can hurt your teeth.

slide image

Sugar-free soda can hurt your teeth.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

It's not just the sugar in soda that's a problem. Carbonated drinks are high in acid, and that destroys tooth enamel. Acid can even be harder on teeth than sugar. The bottom line: Avoid sugary and sugar-free sodas. Drink water – preferably fluorinated -- instead.

Which food is better for your smile?

Which food is better for your smile?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Vegetables like carrots and celery are high in fiber and water, which help clean teeth. They also get more saliva flowing. This neutralizes the acids that cause cavities and gum disease.

 

Foods like tomatoes and citrus fruits are healthy but acidic. So eat them at a meal, when saliva can help wash acid away. Dried fruits are also healthy, but they are high in sugar and can remain on teeth for a long time. If you want fruit, consider a fiber-rich apple instead.

Teeth-whiteners used in a dentist's office are much stronger than over-the-counter (OTC) whiteners.

Teeth-whiteners used in a dentist's office are much stronger than over-the-counter (OTC) whiteners.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The bleaching agent a dentist uses for in-office whitening is  5 to 14 times as strong as the one in OTC products. It whitens better and lasts longer. But it can cost $1,000 or more, while OTC products start as low as $10. Dentist-prescribed gels to use at home are somewhere between – they work better and longer than OTC products but cost $300 to $500. 

Replace your toothbrush:

Replace your toothbrush:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

A furry old toothbrush won't do your teeth much good. When the bristles break down, they don't clean as well. Get a new brush every season -- or sooner if the bristles are flat and frayed. What if your toothbrush still looks good as new after three or four months? You may not be brushing long enough or often enough.

Everyone should use a mouth rinse after brushing and flossing.

Everyone should use a mouth rinse after brushing and flossing.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Your dentist can best advise you whether to use a mouth rinse. Mouthwashes with fluoride help protect tooth enamel. If you have trouble flossing or brushing, using one may help you fight cavities and gum disease. Rinsing also helps flush bits of food out of your mouth, but it doesn't take the place of brushing and flossing for clean teeth.

Which increases your chance of losing a tooth?

Which increases your chance of losing a tooth?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Diabetes makes you more likely to get serious gum disease. Your gums pull away from your teeth, and your teeth can loosen or fall out. Osteoporosis can cause bone loss in your jaw, which anchors your teeth.

 

If you have either of these conditions, it’s all the more reason to take good care of your teeth and gums. And if you have osteoporosis, make sure to get enough calcium and vitamins D and K.

It's best to use a toothbrush with:

It's best to use a toothbrush with:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Using a hard brush can actually wear down the surface of your teeth and gums. So can brushing too hard. Soft, flexible bristles clean between teeth and in hard-to-reach spots better.

 

Gently brushing your teeth and gums for two or three minutes with a soft-bristled brush will get the job done. Brush your tongue too, to get rid of bacteria and keep your breath fresh.

When should you brush your teeth after eating a grapefruit?

When should you brush your teeth after eating a grapefruit?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Brushing right after eating acidic foods can do your teeth more harm than good. Though acid attacks your teeth, brushing can actually push it deeper into the enamel on your teeth. In one study, brushing 20 minutes after drinking a diet soda also eroded the layer of tooth under the enamel.

 

Rinse your mouth with water after eating acidic foods, but wait 30 minutes to an hour to brush.

If you don't have cavities, you won't get gum disease.

If you don't have cavities, you won't get gum disease.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

A number of things can cause or worsen gum disease: Smoking, stress, medications, poor nutrition, obesity, heart disease, and family history are some. Three out of four people in the U.S. have gum disease, but only about 3% get treatment. Because it's painless, you may not know you have it.

 

If your gums bleed easily or are red, swollen, or tender, see your dentist. Treat gum disease early before it worsens and you risk losing teeth.

Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.

Good job! You've got a lot to smile about. You know how to keep your teeth and gums healthy.

Not bad, but you could do better. Brush up on your mouth myths and facts and try again.

You could do better. Brush up on your mouth myths and facts and try again.

Today on WebMD

close up of woman sticking out tongue
Sores, discoloration, bumps and more.
toothbrushes
10 secrets to a brighter smile.
 
Veneer smile
Before and after.
Woman checking her bite in mirror
Why dental care is important.
 

Woman dissatisfied with granola bar
Slideshow
woman with jaw pain
Quiz
 
eroded front teeth
Slideshow
brushing teeth
Video
 

Variety shades of tea
Slideshow
mouth and dental instruments
Article
 
Closeup of a happy young guy brushing his teeth
Tool
womans smile
Video