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    Understanding Tonsillitis -- Diagnosis and Treatment

    What Are the Treatments for Tonsillitis? continued...

    Frequent cases of tonsillitis that affect your child's general health, interfere with school attendance, cause breathing problems (snoring), snoring, or difficulty swallowing may warrant surgical removal of the tonsils (tonsillectomy). This procedure is usually performed as outpatient surgery and your child can go home after a few hours of observation.

    Recovery is usually helped by rest and avoiding vigorous activity. Try to get your child to drink plenty of fluids, but don't force him or her to eat or drink. Older children should be given at least a pint of extra liquids per day. Although ice cream is usually the favorite food to cool the throat, it's okay to offer your child any foods he or she desires if it will make your child more comfortable and help him or her eat. Do only what your doctor advises to lower your child's fever.

    How Can I Prevent Tonsillitis?

    Hand washing remains crucial in preventing the spread of viruses and bacteria that cause tonsillitis. Avoid prolonged contact with anyone who has strep throat and has not been taking antibiotics for at least 24 hours. To be certain, avoid people who have been ill until such time as you are sure they no longer are.

    Tonsillectomy, the surgical removal of the tonsils, is one of the most commonly performed operations in children. Newer surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia have made this 20-minute operation much more tolerable and safer than ever before. The reasons for tonsillectomy have also changed. Until the 1980s, the most common reason for tonsillectomy was because of recurrent infection. In the last 30 years, although tonsillectomy is frequently performed for recurrent infections, the most common reason for removing tonsils is tonsil-enlargement (hypertrophy) causing obstructive symptoms such as snoring, sleep apnea, and difficulty swallowing.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on March 11, 2015
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    How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

    Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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