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Ovarian Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Ovarian Cancer

  1. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    DysgerminomasStandard treatment options:Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with adjuvant chemotherapy.For patients with stage III dysgerminoma, total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy are recommended with removal of as much gross tumor as can be done safely without resection of portions of the urinary tract or large segments of the small or large bowel. Patients who want to preserve fertility may be treated with unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy if chemotherapy is to be employed.[1,2,3,4,5] (Refer to the PDQ summary on Sexuality and Reproductive Issues for more information on fertility.)Combination chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) can cure the majority of such patients. In a report of results from two Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) trials, 19 of 20 patients with incompletely resected tumors who were treated with BEP or cisplatin, vinblastine, and bleomycin (PVB) were

  2. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    The following is a list of ovarian epithelial cancer histologic classifications. Serous cystomas: Serous benign cystadenomas.Serous cystadenomas with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low potential or borderline malignancy).Serous cystadenocarcinomas.Mucinous cystomas: Mucinous benign cystadenomas.Mucinous cystadenomas with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low potential or borderline malignancy).Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas.Endometrioid tumors (similar to adenocarcinomas in the endometrium): Endometrioid benign cysts.Endometrioid tumors with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low malignant potential or borderline malignancy).Endometrioid adenocarcinomas.Clear cell (mesonephroid) tumors: Benign clear cell tumors.Clear cell tumors with

  3. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062935-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

  4. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  5. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options By Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell TumorsTreatment depends on whether the tumor is a dysgerminoma or another type of ovarian germ cell tumor. Treatment of dysgerminoma may include the following: Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymphangiography or CT scan.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by observation.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by radiation therapy.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by chemotherapy.Treatment of other ovarian germ cell tumors may be either: unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by careful observation; orunilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, sometimes followed by combination chemotherapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting

  6. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    Treatment of recurrent ovarian epithelial cancer may include the following:Chemotherapy using one or more anticancer drugs, with or without surgery.A clinical trial of surgery.A clinical trial of targeted therapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent ovarian epithelial cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

  7. Bartter's Syndrome

    Important It is possible that the main title of the report Bartter's Syndrome is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report. ...

  8. Ovarian Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (02 / 15 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.SignificanceUpdated statistics with estimated new cases and deaths for 2013 (cited American Cancer Society as reference 1).This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  9. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  10. Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer

    If you've been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, here is a list of questions from WebMD that you may want to ask your doctor.

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