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Ovarian Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Ovarian Cancer

  1. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  2. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    The following is a list of ovarian epithelial cancer histologic classifications. Serous cystomas: Serous benign cystadenomas.Serous cystadenomas with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low potential or borderline malignancy).Serous cystadenocarcinomas.Mucinous cystomas: Mucinous benign cystadenomas.Mucinous cystadenomas with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low potential or borderline malignancy).Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas.Endometrioid tumors (similar to adenocarcinomas in the endometrium): Endometrioid benign cysts.Endometrioid tumors with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low malignant potential or borderline malignancy).Endometrioid adenocarcinomas.Clear cell (mesonephroid) tumors: Benign clear cell tumors.Clear cell tumors with

  3. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    Ovarian low malignant potential tumors may recur (come back) after they have been treated. The tumors may come back in the other ovary or in other parts of the body.

  4. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (09 / 10 / 2012)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  5. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    Recurrent ovarian germ cell tumor is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the other ovary or in other parts of the body.

  6. Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer

    If you've been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, here is a list of questions from WebMD that you may want to ask your doctor.

  7. Frequently Asked Questions About Ovarian Cancer

    WebMD answers frequently asked questions about ovarian cancer, including symptoms and risk factors.

  8. Oophorectomy - Topic Overview

    What is an oophorectomy?Oophorectomy is the surgical removal of the ovaries, the part of a woman's reproductive system that stores and releases eggs for fertilization and produces female sex hormones. Oophorectomy is often necessary when pelvic disease, such as ovarian cancer or severe endometriosis, is present. In the United States, more than 600, 000 hysterectomies (the surgical removal of a ...

  9. Ovarian Cancer Guide - Cancer: Controlling Nausea and Vomiting From Chemotherapy

    Of all the side effects of chemotherapy, nausea and vomiting are the most common and are among the most feared. But having chemotherapy does not mean that you have to suffer with nausea and vomiting. Key pointsNausea and vomiting can be controlled and even prevented. The best treatment plan is one set up by you and your health care team, based on your particular needs and feelings. You are the ...

  10. Hysterectomy for Ovarian Cancer

    A hysterectomy is the removal of your uterus. The goal of the initial surgery is to remove all visible ovarian cancer.

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