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Ovarian Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Ovarian Cancer

  1. Ovarian Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  2. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062941-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment

  3. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    After ovarian low malignant potential tumor has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if abnormal cells have spread within the ovary or to other parts of the body.The process used to find out whether abnormal cells have spread within the ovary or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. Certain tests or procedures are used for staging. Staging laparotomy (a surgical incision made in the wall of the abdomen to remove ovarian tissue) may be used. Most patients are diagnosed with stage I disease. The following stages are used for ovarian low malignant potential tumor: Stage IIn stage I, the tumor is found in one or both ovaries. Stage I is divided into stage IA, stage IB, and stage IC. Stage IA: The tumor is found inside a single ovary.Stage IB: The tumor is found inside both ovaries.Stage IC: The tumor is found inside one or both

  4. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062968-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment

  5. Ovarian Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000258027-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Cancer Screening

  6. Ovarian Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 08 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

  7. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage III and Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment

    Treatment options for patients with all stages of ovarian epithelial cancer have consisted of surgery followed by chemotherapy.SurgeryPatients diagnosed with stage III and stage IV disease are treated with surgery and chemotherapy; however, the outcome is generally less favorable for patients with stage IV disease. The role of surgery for patients with stage IV disease is unclear, but in most instances, the bulk of the disease is intra-abdominal, and surgical procedures similar to those used in the management of patients with stage III disease are applied. The options for intraperitoneal (IP) regimens are also less likely to apply both practically (as far as inserting an IP catheter at the outset) and theoretically (aimed at destroying microscopic disease in the peritoneal cavity) in patients with stage IV disease. Surgery has been used as a therapeutic modality and also to adequately stage the disease. Surgery should include total abdominal

  8. Ovarian Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Overview

    Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Ovarian Cancer Prevention; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor Treatment; and Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumor Treatment are also available. Evidence of Benefit or Lack of Benefit Associated with ScreeningSingle-threshold cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) levels and transvaginal ultrasound (TVU)There is solid evidence to indicate that routine screening for ovarian cancer with the serum marker CA-125 and TVU does not result in a decrease in mortality from ovarian cancer.Magnitude of Effect: No reduction in mortalityStudy Design: Evidence obtained from one randomized controlled trial.Internal Validity: Good.Consistency: One trial has evaluated the impact on mortality from ovarian cancer.External Validity: Good.Statement of HarmsBased on solid evidence, routine screening for ovarian cancer results in false-positive test results among 9.6% of those screened; of those with false-positive results who had surgery, the complication rate

  9. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    DysgerminomasStandard treatment options:Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with adjuvant chemotherapy.For patients with stage III dysgerminoma, total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy are recommended with removal of as much gross tumor as can be done safely without resection of portions of the urinary tract or large segments of the small or large bowel. Patients who want to preserve fertility may be treated with unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy if chemotherapy is to be employed.[1,2,3,4,5] (Refer to the PDQ summary on Sexuality and Reproductive Issues for more information on fertility.)Combination chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) can cure the majority of such patients. In a report of results from two Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) trials, 19 of 20 patients with incompletely resected tumors who were treated with BEP or cisplatin, vinblastine, and bleomycin (PVB) were

  10. Ovarian Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

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