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    Ovarian Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Ovarian Cancer

    1. Oophorectomy - Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

      Recurrent ovarian epithelial cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. Persistent cancer is cancer that does not go away with treatment.

    2. Oophorectomy - Who Is at Risk?

      Ovarian cancer is rare. The incidence rate for ovarian cancer between 2006 and 2010 was 12.5 cases per 100,000 women.[1] Women with a family history of ovarian cancer are at increased risk, and those with an inherited predisposition to ovarian cancer, such as a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, have a very high risk of developing ovarian cancer (refer to the Lynch syndrome section in the PDQ summary on Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer for more information). Other risk factors for ovarian cancer include obesity, nulliparity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, fertility drugs, and perineal talc. Factors associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer include use of oral contraceptives, multiple pregnancies, breast-feeding, and tubal ligation.[2,3,4,5]References: Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al., eds.: SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010. Bethesda, Md: National Cancer Institute, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013. Also

    3. Oophorectomy - Changes to This Summary (07 / 09 / 2012)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Stage Information for Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Updated staging information for 2010 (cited FIGO Committee on Gynecologic Oncology and Edge et al. as references 1 and 2, respectively).This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

    4. Oophorectomy - Description of the Evidence

      PathogenesisThe pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma remains unclear. Several theories have been proposed to explain the epidemiology of ovarian cancer including the theory of incessant ovulation,[1,2] gonadotropin stimulation,[3] excess androgenic stimulation,[4] and inflammation.[5] Associated risk factors for ovarian cancer support some or all of these hypotheses. Oral contraceptive use is consistently associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer and may operate through preventing the trauma from repeated ovulation by lowering exposure to gonadotropins. No one theory, however, explains all the associated risk factors.Protective Factors Factors associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer include: (1) using oral contraceptives, (2) having and breastfeeding children, (3) having a bilateral tubal ligation or hysterectomy, and (4) having a prophylactic oophorectomy.Oral contraceptives Multiple studies have consistently demonstrated a decrease in

    5. Oophorectomy - About This PDQ Summary

      Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of ovarian low-malignant potential tumors. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a

    6. Oophorectomy - General Information About Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

      Related Summaries Note: Other PDQ summaries containing information related to ovarian epithelial cancer include the following: Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Ovarian Cancer Screening Ovarian Cancer Prevention Unusual Cancers of Childhood Statistics Note: Estimated new cases and deaths from ovarian cancer in the United States in 2010:[ 1 ] New cases: 21,880. Deaths: 13,850. Note: Some ...

    7. Oophorectomy - Changes to This Summary (07 / 30 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.SignificanceUpdated statistics with estimated new cases and deaths for 2013 (cited American Cancer Society as reference 1).This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

    8. Oophorectomy - nci_ncicdr0000062941-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment

    9. Ovarian Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (09 / 11 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.

    10. Oophorectomy - Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

      DysgerminomasStandard treatment options:Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been used effectively for patients with recurrent dysgerminoma with and without adjuvant radiation therapy.[1]Treatment options under clinical evaluation:Patients with recurrent pure dysgerminoma of the ovary are candidates for clinical trials, such as (GOG-90), which has been closed. Some consideration should be given to the use of high-dose regimens with rescue. Other Germ Cell TumorsStandard treatment options:Patients with recurrent germ cell tumors of the ovary other than pure dysgerminoma should be treated with chemotherapy, the type of which is determined by previous treatment.[2] Radiation therapy is not effective in this setting. Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is effective.[1,3,4] Patients who do not respond to a cisplatin-based combination may still attain a durable remission with VAC or ifosfamide/cisplatin as salvage therapy.[1] Newer potential treatments include an ifosfamide combination [5]

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