Skip to content

Health & Baby

Font Size

Congenital Hydrocele - Topic Overview

What is a hydrocele?

A hydrocele (say "HY-druh-seel") is a buildup of watery fluid around one or both testicles. It causes the scrotum or groin area to swell.

A congenital hydrocele is one that a baby is born with. Hydroceles can also occur later in life for a number of reasons. This topic is about congenital hydroceles, which are common in male newborns.

The swelling from a hydrocele may look scary, but it is usually not a problem. It will probably go away by the time your baby is 2 years old.

What causes a congenital hydrocele?

A month or so before birth, a baby's testicles move from the belly area down into the scrotum, along with a bit of the lining of the belly area. The lining shrivels up, leaving a small empty space around the testicles. This space normally closes up by the time a baby is 2 years old.

Sometimes fluid leaks into the space, filling it like a small water balloon. This is a hydrocele camera.gif. When the space closes up and traps the fluid inside, it's called a noncommunicating hydrocele. Usually, the body absorbs the fluid over time.

If the space doesn't close up the way it should, the fluid moves back and forth between the scrotum and the belly area. This is called a communicating hydrocele. The swelling comes and goes. This problem is usually fixed with surgery to help prevent a hernia in the groin.

Another type of hydrocele is a hydrocele of the spermatic cord. It is located higher up in the scrotum. The fluid is usually absorbed within a few months and at the latest by age 1 or 2. A hydrocele of the cord may be mistaken for an inguinal hernia.

What are the symptoms?

The usual symptom is a swollen scrotum. The swelling does not hurt. If your child seems to be in pain, call the doctor. Pain may mean that your child has a hernia or other problem.

How is a congenital hydrocele diagnosed?

Doctors diagnose a congenital hydrocele during a physical exam that includes questions about the child's health. The swelling is often easy to see, so the hydrocele is typically not hard to identify. But the doctor will want to rule out other conditions.

    1|2
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    mother on phone holding baby
    When you should call 911.
    Mother with baby
    Unexpected ways your life will change.
     
    baby acne
    What’s normal – and what’s not.
    baby asleep on moms shoulder
    Help your baby get the sleep he needs.
     

    mother holding baby at night
    ARTICLE
    mother with sick child
    QUIZ
     
    Chinese mother breast feeding newborn baby girl
    SLIDESHOW
    Track Your Babys Vaccines
    TOOL
     
    Baby Napping 10 Dos And Donts
    Slideshow
    Woman holding feet up to camera
    Article
     
    Father kissing newborn baby
    Article
    baby gear slideshow
    Slideshow