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Divide and Conquer Household Chores

Have a family plan for everyday household tasks and you’ll teach your kids a great life lesson.
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Roy Benaroch, MD

Doing chores is a tradition in many families. Chores help kids learn responsibility, and sharing chores gives you help around the house.

Not sure your kids will go for it? Take heart! There are ways to make chores a little bit, well, less of a chore for everyone.

The Value of Chores for Children

Parenting expert Jim Fay, co-founder of the Love and Logic website, says we all need to feel needed and to know that we're making a contribution -- even kids. "But they can't feel that way if they don't have chores and make contributions to the family," Fay says.

Roger W. McIntire, University of Maryland psychology professor and author of Raising Good Kids in Tough Times, says, "A child has to have some responsibilities."

That may all sound fine, but how do you get your kids onboard?

Pitfalls to Avoid When it Comes to Chores

Don't insist on perfection. No one is perfect, and it's better to have a more relaxed approach to how well your kids do  their chores. Otherwise, McIntire says, you might have a struggle on your hands. Or you might jump in and do it for them, which would undermine the whole point.

Don't delay. You might think your child is too young. But your kids may be more capable than you think. Kids can do a lot of chores at an early stage, McIntire says. For example, getting clothes to the laundry or cleaning up after dinner. "We hold back too long because we think they ought to be ready first. But that puts the cart before the horse," he says. That is, they'll learn by doing.

Don't be stingy with praise. Get that praise going right away! Don't wait until the chore is done. Praise and encourage the child while the chore is in progress. You want to build positive momentum, especially with young kids.

Don't be inconsistent. Elizabeth Pantley, author of parenting books including Kid Cooperation: How to Stop Yelling, Nagging, and Pleading and Get Kids to Cooperate, says if your kids aren't expected to regularly follow through, they might start putting chores off in the hope that someone else will do them for them.

Make a Chores Chart

"Create a list of every job it takes to keep a family going," Fay says. Have kids pick out the chores they'd most like to do. Then create a chart.

First, check that everyone has an age-appropriate chore. Then divide the chart into three columns. One is for the list of chores and whose chore it is; another is for deadlines; the last one is for making a check mark when the chore is done. Put the chart where everyone can see it and let everyone follow through on their own assignments.

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