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How to Help Your Child With Homework

As it turns out, the key is providing guidance -- not doing the work yourself.
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WebMD the Magazine - Feature

Jill Houk's 10-year-old son is bright. So why is homework a constant battle? "He often claims he can't do it," says the 41-year-old chef from Chicago. "For the most part, I have him tough it out. Sometimes I cave and give more help than I probably should. I'm constantly unsure if I've taken the right approach."

Houk is grappling with what Kenneth Koedinger, PhD, calls the assistance dilemma. "It's finding that sweet spot, the right level of help that will get them up to speed but not take the learning away," says Koedinger, director of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center at Carnegie Mellon University. The key, he says, is to be flexible and adaptable, jumping in when a child gets stuck and then backing off as soon as he's over the hump.

Homework Guide

Kids learn best when they're given examples of how to solve problems, Koedinger says. Instead of doing the work, show your child how you'd do a similar task, step by step. After each step, have him explain to you why you did it. For example, in the infamous algebra problem where two trains are converging at different speeds, you might begin by drawing a diagram of the two trains. Ask your child, "What can this diagram show me?"

You can also offer alternative ways of approaching a task. If a child struggles with math equations, put them into a story format. "Let's say Brian worked four hours and earned $24; what would his hourly wage be?" This lets your child apply different parts of his brain. Research shows that we use the anterior prefrontal cortex to solve a story problem, and the posterior parietal cortex for equations -- but using either one can lead to a correct solution. 

When it comes to learning, "no pain, no gain" is a misconception, Koedinger says. While a certain amount of struggling is normal, "pointless pain -- banging your head against the wall -- is a waste of time." If your child drags his feet on assignments, he has likely missed a key concept. Without enough basic knowledge, his homework won't be up to par and learning as a whole will be slower. You might have to review earlier lessons to find the sticking point.

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