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Watchdog Group: Reduce Junk Food Ads For Kids

Advocates Say Junk Food Ads Make Obesity Epidemic Worse
By
WebMD Health News

Jan. 6, 2005 -- A watchdog group called on food and beverage makers Thursday to scale back advertising of junk food to children, warning that relentless marketing is contributing to rising rates of obesity among young people.

The report calls on food manufacturers, media companies, schools, and others to limit child-targeted marketing to foods that meet criteria for good nutrition. It also asks companies to scale back the use of marketing techniques pairing unhealthy food with popular cartoon characters, movies, and other images that children enjoy but critics say undermine the ability of parents to monitor what kids eat.

Ideally, only healthful foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain products would be marketed to kids, writes the Center for Science in the Public Interest, in a news release.

"If companies want to put [Finding] Nemo toys in bags of baby carrots, we're all for it. But that's not what's happening," says Margo G. Wootan, who authored the guidelines for the CSPI.

Instead, the group displayed dozens of food products identifiable not only by their high-fat or sugar contents, but also by bright packaging, movie tie-ins, or cartoon character endorsement on boxes. "What we're really asking is that marketers act responsibly, and not urge kids to eat foods that could harm their health," says Wootan.

Advocates have long called for curbs on advertising aimed at minors, complaining that companies target youngsters who spend more time than ever absorbing media messages.

Federal lawmakers and regulators have balked at efforts to curb food industry advertising, usually citing free speech concerns. Wootan says that Thursday's guidelines are a call for companies to voluntarily change their marketing practices.

Companies should now cease targeting children for advertising about foods high in fat, sugar, or sodium or those that are delivered in unreasonably large portion sizes, the guidelines state. They also call on media companies and schools to refuse to market foods and drinks that do not meet basic nutritional standards for kids.

The CSPI suggests that companies market:

  • Drinks that contain at least 50% fruit juice and no added caloric sweeteners
  • Water and seltzer without added caloric sweeteners
  • Low-fat and fat-free milk, including flavored milks

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