Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Parkinson's Disease Health Center

Font Size

New Blood Test for Parkinson's Studied

Test Has High Degree of Accuracy; Parkinson’s Experts Cautiously Optimistic
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Feb. 22, 2012 -- An experimental blood test for Parkinson's disease is more than 90% accurate in diagnosing the progressive disorder that affects movement and balance, according to its developers.

The test requires a single drop of blood, says Robert Nagele, PhD, a professor of medicine at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine.

It looks for specific proteins that are produced by the body in response to Parkinson's disease, he tells WebMD.  

Nagele is also the founder of Durin Technologies, the test developer. Another co-researcher is a paid consultant for the company.

No blood test is yet commercially available for Parkinson's, which affects 5 million people worldwide. The study is published in PLoS One.

The news was met with cautious optimism by two experts.

About Parkinson's

In Parkinson's, the nerve cells or neurons in a brain region responsible for muscle movement and coordination deteriorate over time. Normally these cells produce a chemical called dopamine. Dopamine helps regulate such bodily functions as movement.

"Parkinson's affects a specific part of the brain known as the substantia nigra," Nagele says. At least a third of the neurons in this area have already died before symptoms appear, he says.

Symptoms include shaking, tremor, slowness of movement, stiffness in the arms, legs, and trunk, and balance problems.

Doctors diagnose it by taking a medical history and doing a neurological exam.

A blood test could help doctors diagnose and treat the disease earlier. Many teams are working on such tests.

Blood Test for Parkinson's: Study Details

When brain cells die, Nagele says, they explode ''like a water balloon breaking."

The contents of those dying cells spill partially back into the blood. "Their debris is released and your body will sense it and develop autoantibodies to clear that debris," he says.

The new test looks for these autoantibodies in the blood specific to the disease. The researchers narrowed down a list of more than 100 of these autoantibodies to 10 that looked most promising. When these antibodies rise to a certain level, it signals disease, Nagele says.

To evaluate the Parkinson's test, Nagele's team looked at more than 150 blood samples, including:

Today on WebMD

Parkinsons disease illustration
Causes, symptoms, and treatments.
hands on walker
How does the disease progress?
man with serious expression
8 common questions and answers.
intelligence quotient illustration
What are the advantages of DBS?
Parkinsons Disease Medications
Questions Doctor Parkinsons
Eating Right
Parkinsons Exercise
daughter consoling depressed mother
senior man's hands
Parkinsons Daily