Reviewed by Michael Smith on February 01, 2016

Sources

Leah Curney, host.; Noah Forman, host.; Your Amazing Brain: "The Science of Love."; ChangingMinds.org: "Dopamine."; SexInfo Online: "The Sexual Response Cycle."; Tufts: "Emotion on the Brain."; Georgiadis, J. R. European Journal of Neuroscience, 2006.; SAMHSA/CSAT: "Treatment Improvement Protocols.; BrainWorld: "The Brains Behind the Orgasm."; Sound Effects: freeSFX.

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Video Transcript

Leah: Noah, did you know that the human sexual response cycle has four phases?

NOAH: Yeah, of course. Excitement, plateau of arousal, orgasm, and-- what was that last one again?

Leah: Resolution.

NOAH: Right. Right. Where you quietly dress and sneak out. Leah: Wait. What was that?

NOAH: Nothing. No. Let's just focus on orgasms and why they feel so good. Leah: Yes. Let's.

[MUSIC PLAYING] Leah: During sex, there's a measurable activity decrease in the brain regions associated with behavioral control, fear, anxiety, and judgment, clearing the way for a stress-free, good old time.

NOAH: So while you're getting jiggy with it, thousands of pleasure signals are being sent from the central nervous system to the brain, flooding it with dopamine.

Leah: That's a chemical body produces to make you feel good.

NOAH: Oh, yeah. And eventually your body feels so good that for men it leads to an overwhelming crescendo of intense pleasure that can last up to a whole 10 seconds.

Leah: A woman's orgasm on average lasts 20 seconds, but can be much longer. And unlike men, women also have multiple orgasms. And that's why an orgasm feels so-- wait. Are you trying to sneak out of here?

NOAH: Oh, yeah. I guess that's just, like, a force of habit. But I'll text you or something. This was fun. Cool.

Leah: I bet he has another co-host.