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Sexual Conditions Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Sexual Conditions

  1. Syphilis - Treatment Overview

    Prompt treatment of syphilis is needed to cure the infection, prevent complications, and prevent the spread of the infection to others.

  2. Syphilis: Chancre - Topic Overview

    The first symptom of syphilis is a sore called a chancre (say shanker) that is usually painless. The sore begins at the site of infection as a small, solid, raised skin sore less than 1 cm (0.4 in.) across. It develops into a red, usually painless open sore with a scooped-out appearance. The sore usually does not bleed.Two or more chancres may develop at the same time, usually in the genital area, but sometimes on the hands, mouth, or other body surfaces.Chancres contain millions of syphilis bacteria and are highly contagious.

  3. Syphilis - Topic Overview

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or sexually transmitted infection (STI) that, when left untreated, can progress to a late stage that causes serious health problems.

  4. Syphilis: Gummata - Topic Overview

    Gummata are growths of pink, fleshy tissue that contain syphilis bacteria. They may appear as nodules or ulcers or become masses that are like tumors. Gummata are rare. When they do occur, they range from 1 mm to 1 cm in size. Common sites of gummata include the:Skin, where they cause shallow open sores that heal slowly.Mucous membranes. These gummas may become cancerous.Bones, where they cause destruction of bones and pain that is especially severe at night.Eyes, resulting in visual impairment that may lead to blindness.Respiratory system, where they cause hoarseness, breathing problems, and wheezing.Gastrointestinal system, where they cause stomach pain, inability to eat large meals, belching, and weight loss.Antibiotic treatment cures the syphilis infection and stops the development of gummata. But the scar tissue that forms after successful treatment will probably not go away.

  5. Syphilis - Exams and Tests

    Learn about exams and tests for syphilis.

  6. Syphilis - Prevention

    Learn ways to help prevent syphilis infection.

  7. Stages of Syphilis - Topic Overview

    Syphilis is described in terms of its four stages: primary, secondary, latent (hidden), and tertiary (late).Primary stageDuring the primary stage, a sore (chancre) that is usually painless develops at the site where the bacteria entered the body. This commonly occurs within 3 weeks of exposure but can range from 10 to 90 days. A person is highly contagious during the primary stage.In men, a chancre often appears in the genital area, usually (but not always) on the penis. These sores are often painless.In women, chancres can develop on the outer genitals or on the inner part of the vagina. A chancre may go unnoticed if it occurs inside the vagina or at the opening to the uterus (cervix), because the sores are usually painless and are not easily visible.Swelling of the lymph nodes may occur near the area of the chancre.A chancre may also occur in an area of the body other than the genitals. The chancre lasts for 3 to 6 weeks, heals without treatment, and may leave a thin scar. But

  8. Syphilis - Cause

    Learn about the causes of syphilils.

  9. Penis Disorders

    WebMD looks at disorders of the penis that affect men's sexual health.

  10. Sexual Problems in Women - Topic Overview

    What are sexual problems? In women, common sexual problems include feeling little or no sexual interest or arousal or having trouble with orgasm. For some women, pain during intercourse is a problem. In the simplest sense, if you have a sexual problem, s

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