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Hair Loss Health Center

Alopecia Areata

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People with just one or two patches of AA often have a full and spontaneous recovery within two years whether or not they receive treatment. However, about 30% of individuals find the condition persists and becomes more extensive, or they have repeated cycles of hair loss and re-growth.

Traditionally, AA has been regarded as a stress-induced disease. Unfortunately that view persists today, even among some dermatologists, even though very little scientific evidence supports the view.

AA is much more complicated. Extreme stress might trigger AA in some people, but recent research shows that genes can also be involved. There are probably several genes that can make an individual more susceptible to developing AA. The more of these genes a person has, the more likely they will develop AA.

Some researchers believe there are a wide range of contributing factors that make someone more susceptible to developing AA. Hormones, allergies, viruses, and even toxins might contribute. Probably several factors combined are involved in the activation of AA in any one individual.

Treatments for Alopecia

There are a range of treatments for AA, but none are effective for everyone and some people with AA don't respond to any treatment. Because some of the available treatments have a high risk of side effects, they are often not used for children.

The most common AA treatment involves the use of corticosteroids. Corticosteroid creams applied to the bald patches are popular with the average dermatologist, although this treatment approach is only successful for the very mildest cases. A more potent approach is to inject corticosteroid solutions into the bald patches. This can work well for some people, but close monitoring is required to ensure that side effects, such as skin thinning at the site of injection, do not occur.

In extensive cases, systemic corticosteroids (those taken in pill or other form to affect your body) are used, though not continuously since they can cause significant side effects like bone thinning. But short-term "pulse therapy" often has good results.

More specialized treatment approaches involve the application of contact sensitizing chemicals to the skin. These cause an allergic reaction that can help promote hair growth. That may sound counterintuitive but it seems to work. A variety of experimental approaches are currently in laboratory and clinical trials. One group of drugs being tested are "biologics," which have bits of protein that interfere in a very specific way with the activity of immune cells. Biologics are injected systemically to damp down the immune activity and allow hair to regrow. The results of these trials are awaited with much interest.

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