Skin Problems & Treatments Health Home

Picture of the Hair

Human Anatomy

Anatomical illustration of hair follicle

Hair is simple in structure, but has important functions in social functioning. Hair is made of a tough protein called keratin. A hair follicle anchors each hair into the skin. The hair bulb forms the base of the hair follicle. In the hair bulb, living cells divide and grow to build the hair shaft. Blood vessels nourish the cells in the hair bulb, and deliver hormones that modify hair growth and structure at different times of life.

Hair growth occurs in cycles consisting of three phases:

  • Anagen (growth phase): Most hair is growing at any given time. Each hair spends several years in this phase.
  • Catagen (transitional phase): Over a few weeks, hair growth slows and the hair follicle shrinks.
  • Telogen (resting phase): Over months, hair growth stops and the old hair detaches from the hair follicle. A new hair begins the growth phase, pushing the old hair out.

Hair grows at different rates in different people; the average rate is around one-half inch per month. Hair color is created by pigment cells producing melanin in the hair follicle. With aging, pigment cells die, and hair turns gray.

Pagination