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News Related to Sleep Disorders

  1. Sleep Breathing Holds Depression Clues

    Sept. 21, 2006 -- People who have breathing problems during sleep may be more likely to develop depression, compared with sleepers who breathe easily. So say Paul Peppard, PhD, and colleagues from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The study supports the theory

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  2. Implants May Ease Sleep Apnea

    Sept. 18, 2006 -- Tiny cylinders implanted in the soft palate at the back of the mouth may be a long-term solution for some people with obstructive sleep apnea. That's according to Loyola University's Regina Walker, MD, and colleagues. They studied 22 people who each got three of the small cylinders

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  3. Insomnia: Alternative Medicine Popular

    Sept. 18, 2006 -- Many Americans toss, turn, and try complementary and alternative medicines to ease insomnia. More than 35 million U.S. adults regularly had insomnia in 2002, and 1.6 million of them tried complementary or alternative therapies to get some sleep. Those figures come from Nancy Pearso

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  4. Sleep Apnea Hurts Women's Sex Lives

    Sept. 8, 2006 -- Snoring may affect women's sex lives in ways beyond the occasional night on the couch. A new study shows that undiagnosed sleep apnea sleep apnea, a common disorder associated with snoring, may decrease women's sexual function by reducing sexual desire, sensation, and lubrication, a

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  5. New Kind of Hard-to-Treat Sleep Apnea

    Sept. 1, 2006 -- Newly recognized, hard-to-treat "complex sleep apnea" disrupts the rest of one in six sleep apnea sufferers, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Sleep apnea is a breathing problem that keeps sufferers -- and their bedmates -- from getting a proper night's rest. Until now, there were only two

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  6. Sleep Apnea Ups Stroke Risk in Elderly

    Aug. 30, 2006 -- Older adults with sleep apnea may face a more than doubled risk of stroke , according to a new study. Researchers found undiagnosed sleep apnea increased the risk of stroke by 2.5 times among the elderly. Previous studies have linked severe sleep apnea to strokes in middle-aged adul

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  7. Sleep Apnea in Kids Cuts Brain Power

    Aug. 21, 2006 -- Sleep apnea in children can lead to brain cell damage and lowered intelligence, new research suggests. Brain imaging showed that children with untreated, severe sleep apnea show evidence of injury in the regions of the brain responsible for learning, memory, and complex thought. The

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  8. 1 in 10 Truckers Drive Sleepy

    Aug. 15, 2006 -- One in 10 of those 18 wheelers barreling down the highway beside you may have a sleepy driver at the wheel, putting you, the driver, and others at risk, says a newly published study. Researchers found that 13% of truckers routinely skimped on sleep, and nearly 5% had severe sleep ap

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  9. Poor Sleep Hurts Job Satisfaction

    July 21, 2006 - A bad night's sleep might mean a really bad day at the office the next day. A new study suggests lack of sleep or insomnia insomnia not only makes you cranky and irritable, it may also greatly affect your job satisfaction. Researchers found men and women who suffered from insomnia we

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  10. Energy Drinks May Not Beat Sleepiness

    July 20, 2006 -- If you're skimping on sleep, you might not want to count on high-sugar, low-caffeine "energy drinks" to keep you alert for long. "Sugar rushes" from such drinks don't appear to be very effective at overcoming sleepiness, write Clare Anderson, BSc, PhD, and colleagues in Human Psycho

    Read Full Article
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You say you are able to function well with fewer than seven hours of sleep. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get too little sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia or other conditions affecting your sleep.

Sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get too little sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have difficulty sleeping, have insomnia, or have other sleep disorders.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

It's good that you usually do get more sleep, since sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. And if you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

You say you are able to function well with fewer than seven hours of sleep. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

It's good that you usually do get more sleep because sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. And if you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get less sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have difficulty sleeping or have insomnia or other sleep disorders.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Whether your sleep routine involves taking a warm bath, reading a book, or meditating, it's important to keep your bedtime and routine consistent every night and wake up around the same time every morning.

Click here to read more about the importance of sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and wake time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Since you usually sleep this amount, if you often aren't feeling your best, you should consider talking to your doctor. Could you have an underlying condition? Are you feeling anxious or depressed? Have you taken medication that disrupted your sleep? Do you or could you have sleep apnea? Or do you naturally require a little bit more sleep?

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can also have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and wake time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Since you usually sleep longer, if you often aren't feeling your best, you should consider talking to your doctor. Could you have an underlying condition? Are you feeling anxious or depressed? Have you taken medication that disrupted your sleep? Do you or could you have sleep apnea? Or do you naturally require a little bit more sleep?

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can also have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Whether your sleep routine involves taking a warm bath, reading a book, or meditating, it's also important to keep bedtime consistent and wake up around the same time every morning.

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and waking up at the same time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health.

Since you usually get less sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia, another sleep disorder, or conditions affecting your sleep.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health.

Since you usually get less sleep, talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia or another sleep disorder or conditions affecting your sleep.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

SOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities--United States, 2005-2008. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2011; 60:239.

Carskadon, MA, Dement, WC. Normal Human Sleep: An Overview. In: Principles and Practices of Sleep Medicine, Fifth, Kryger, MH, Roth, et al. (Eds), Elsevier Saunders, St. Louis, MO 2011. p.16.

Harvard University: "Sleep, Performance, and Public Safety."

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