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    Medical Reference Related to Sleep Apnea

    1. Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea - Topic Overview

      Snoring is a major symptom of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). But even though most people who have sleep apnea snore,not all people who snore have sleep apnea. Snoring occurs when the flow of air from the mouth or nose to the lungs is disturbed during sleep,usually by a blockage or narrowing in the nose,mouth,or throat (airway). If you snore and do not have sleep apnea,your snoring is ...

    2. Tracheostomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

      Tracheostomy is sometimes used to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In this surgery, the surgeon creates a permanent opening in the neck to the windpipe (trachea). He or she then puts a tube into the opening to let air in.

    3. Sleep Apnea: Uvulopalatoplasty - Topic Overview

      Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is a technique that uses lasers to perform surgery for some sleep-related breathing disorders. It may be used if you have: Loud,habitual snoring. Research shows,though,that snoring may return,usually within 2 years after the surgery. 1 Upper airway resistance syndrome,in which nighttime breathing is obstructed but does not actually stop. Symptoms ...

    4. Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea - Topic Overview

      The first treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are lifestyle changes,such as losing weight or not drinking alcohol before bed,and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). If these do not work,or if an obvious tissue or bone problem is causing your sleep apnea,surgery is an option. Common surgeries for sleep apnea include uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP),which is removal ...

    5. Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring

      Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are surgeries that remove the tonsils and adenoids.

    6. Sleep Apnea: Uvulopalatoplasty - Topic Overview

      Oral devices (also called oral appliances or mandibular repositioning devices) are sometimes used to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). They push the tongue and jaw forward, which makes the airway larger and improves airflow. This also decreases the chance that tissue will collapse and narrow the airway when you breathe in. See a picture of a mandibular repositioning device (MRD).Oral breathing devices are sometimes a reasonable alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Although oral breathing devices generally do not work as well as CPAP, they may be considered for people who:1, 2Have mild or moderate sleep apnea.Prefer not to use or who have failed CPAP treatment.Had surgery that did not work.Tried behavioral changes that did not work.Are at a healthy weight.Choose a dentist or orthodontist who has experience fitting these devices. And go back to your dentist for regular check-ups to make sure the device still fits well.Oral breathing devices can improve sleep

    7. Sleep Apnea: Uvulopalatoplasty - Topic Overview

      Fiber-optic pharyngoscopy is a procedure that allows your doctor to look into the upper part of your respiratory system. He or she may use it to help decide how to treat your obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). You remain awake during the procedure. Your doctor gives you medicine ( anesthesia ) to numb your throat and then places a thin,flexible tube (endoscope) inside your nostril and gently ...

    8. Sleep Apnea: Uvulopalatoplasty - Topic Overview

      Sleep apnea occurs when you regularly stop breathing for 10 seconds or longer during sleep. It can be mild,moderate,or severe,based on the number of times an hour that you stop breathing (apnea) or that airflow to your lungs is reduced (hypopnea). This is called the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Mild apnea. Mild apnea is defined as 5 to 14 episodes of apnea or reduced airflow to the lungs ...

    9. Sleep Apnea: Uvulopalatoplasty - Health Tools

      Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems. Sleep Apnea: Should I Have Surgery?

    10. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

      Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is a procedure that removes excess tissue in the throat to make the airway wider.

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