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    Stroke Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Stroke

    1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Other Treatment

      A brief description of carotid artery stenting to help prevent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke.

    2. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Prevention

      You can help prevent a transient ischemic attack (TIA) by controlling your risk factors for stroke.

    3. Stroke Guide - Treatment Overview

      The sooner stroke treatment starts, the better. Get the facts about the treatment of stroke.

    4. Stroke Guide - Exams and Tests

      Time is critical when diagnosing a stroke. A quick diagnosis within the first 3 hours may enable your doctor to use medications that can lead to a better recovery. The first priority will be to determine whether you are having an ischemic or hemorrhagic s

    5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      You cannot drive after having a stroke until your doctor says that you can. This may be hard to accept. You may feel that this is a big loss of independence. But any problems with your vision, speech, or ability to move quickly after a stroke can change your ability to drive safely. You need your doctor's approval for the safety of yourself and others.After your doctor says that you can drive, talk to the motor vehicle department and ask about the rules for people who have had a stroke. You may need to take classes, be tested again, and have changes made to your car. Some stroke rehab centers give driver training classes.If you cannot drive because of problems from your stroke, check with your stroke rehab center about programs that offer special vans that can take you to and from places. Senior groups and volunteer agencies may also offer transportation services.

    6. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Some people who have a stroke suffer loss of bladder control (urinary incontinence) after the stroke. But this is usually temporary. And it can have many causes, including infection, constipation, and the effects of medicines.If you have problems controlling your bladder, your doctor may: Test a urine sample to see if you have an infection. Do tests to see how you urinate, which can help you and your doctor decide what treatment might work best for you.Help you develop a schedule of regular bathroom use that fits your abilities.Suggest that you wear protective clothing or a pad.Prescribe medicines, depending on the cause of your bladder problems.Some things you can do to prevent bladder leakage include:Emptying your bladder at regular intervals, including when you first wake up and at bedtime.Controlling your liquid intake, such as drinking liquids at regular intervals and limiting fluid intake after dinner.Urinary retentionYou may have trouble emptying your bladder completely

    7. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Some people who have had a stroke have problems seeing in some or all of the normal areas of vision. For example, people with left-sided paralysis may have difficulty seeing to the left. If the problem is due to a vision loss, most people learn to make up for this loss by turning their heads. If the person does not turn his or her head to the affected side, that side of the body may be ignored or neglected.Caregivers may notice signs that the person is ignoring the affected side, such as:Mentioning or responding to stimulation only on the unaffected side of the body.Using only the unaffected arm or leg.Looking only to the environment on the unaffected side.Noticing only someone who speaks or approaches from the unaffected side of the body.Responding to only half of the objects he or she would normally see, such as eating from just one side of the plate.Not recognizing the affected arm and leg as belonging to his or her body and thinking that they belong to someone else.Thinking that

    8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Health Tools

      An interactive tool about deciding whether to have carotid endarterectomy for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).

    9. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Depending on which side of the brain was affected by a stroke, the way a person approaches tasks may be different than it was before the stroke.Stroke on the left side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the left side of the brain tend to be slow, cautious, and disorganized when they are doing unfamiliar activities. They appear anxious and hesitant, which is often quite different from the way they were before the stroke.It may be helpful to offer reassurance or words of encouragement. But don't praise someone for imaginary progress.Offer praise after each step in a task. Allow time for self-correction of mistakes. If the person cannot correct the mistake, point out the error and give a hint.Stroke on the right side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the right side of the brain tend to be impulsive and act too quickly. They may act as if they are unaware of their problems. They often try to do things that are beyond their abilities and that may be unsafe, such as

    10. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      After a stroke, you may not feel temperature, touch, pain, or sharpness on your affected side. You may have:Feelings of heaviness, numbness, tingling, or prickling or greater sensitivity on the affected side.No sense of how your muscles and joints are operating together, which may affect your balance.If you cannot feel an object, you may be more likely to hurt yourself.If you have a tendency to clench your fist on the affected arm, keep your fingernails short and smooth so that you do not cut yourself.If you cannot feel sensations in your feet, cut and file your toenails straight across so that you do not scratch yourself.Soaking your hands and feet may make your nails easier to cut. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about the care of your feet.If you cannot feel heat on your affected side, you may be more prone to burns. Tips to prevent burns include the following:Test the temperature of bath water or dishwater using your unaffected side.Bathe and do dishes in lukewarm

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