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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Symptoms

    Learn the symptoms of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

  2. Stroke: Hesitant or Impulsive? - Topic Overview

    Depending on which side of the brain was affected by a stroke, the way a person approaches tasks may be different than it was before the stroke.Stroke on the left side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the left side of the brain tend to be slow, cautious, and disorganized when they are doing unfamiliar activities. They appear anxious and hesitant, which is often quite different from the way they were before the stroke.It may be helpful to offer reassurance or words of encouragement. But don't praise someone for imaginary progress.Offer praise after each step in a task. Allow time for self-correction of mistakes. If the person cannot correct the mistake, point out the error and give a hint.Stroke on the right side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the right side of the brain tend to be impulsive and act too quickly. They may act as if they are unaware of their problems. They often try to do things that are beyond their abilities and that may be unsafe, such as

  3. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Surgery

    information on carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting, surgical procedures to reduce the risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).

  4. Stroke: Perception Changes - Topic Overview

    When a stroke occurs on the right side of the brain,a person's ability to judge distance,size,position,rate of movement,form,and the way parts relate to the whole is affected (spatial-perceptual problems). People with these problems may have more trouble learning to care for themselves. Signs of perception problems are often noticed by the caregiver of a person who has had a stroke. ...

  5. Stroke: Getting Dressed - Topic Overview

    A stroke often affects movement and use of one side of the body, so getting dressed is often difficult for people after a stroke.Getting dressed may be easier if you use stocking/sock aids, rings or strings attached to zipper pulls, and buttonhooks. Talk with a nurse or physical therapist about assistive devices that may help you get dressed. Clothing may be easier to put on if it has features such as:Velcro closures.Elastic waistbands and shoelaces.Snaps and grippers.To make getting dressed easier:Lay out your clothes in the order that you will put them on, with those you will put on first on top of the pile.Sit down while you dress.Put your affected arm or leg into the piece of clothing first, before the unaffected arm or leg.Removing clothing that has to go over your head may be difficult. To undress after a stroke has affected an arm or leg, remove the stronger arm or leg from the clothing first, then slip out your affected arm or leg.

  6. Stroke Guide - Exams and Tests

    Time is critical when diagnosing a stroke. A quick diagnosis within the first 3 hours may enable your doctor to use medications that can lead to a better recovery. The first priority will be to determine whether you are having an ischemic or hemorrhagic s

  7. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Home Treatment

    Home treatment is not appropriate for a transient ischemic attack (TIA). If you think you are having a TIA, do not ignore the symptoms and do not try to manage them at home. Seek emergency medical care when symptoms first appear.

  8. Stroke: How to Prevent Another One - Topic Overview

    After you've had a stroke, you may be worried that you could have another one. That's easy to understand. But the good news is that there are things you can do to reduce your risk of having another stroke. Taking medicine, doing stroke rehabilitation, and making healthy lifestyle changes can help.Take your medicinesYou'll need to take medicines to help prevent another stroke. Be sure to take your medicines exactly as prescribed. And don't stop taking them unless your doctor tells you to. If you stop taking your medicines, you can increase your risk of having another stroke.Some of the medicines your doctor may prescribe include:Aspirin and other antiplatelet medicines to prevent blood clots.Anticoagulants to prevent blood clots, especially for people who have atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat).Statins to lower high cholesterol. Statins can even protect against stroke in people who don't have heart disease or high cholesterol.1ACE inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin II

  9. Stroke: Life-Threatening Complications - Topic Overview

    Complications that threaten a person's life may develop soon after stroke symptoms occur. Preventing these complications is a major focus of initial stroke treatment. Life-threatening complications include: Increased pressure on the brain,which develops when the brain swells after a large stroke. Such swelling occurs quickly,becomes most severe within 3 to 5 days after the stroke,and can ...

  10. Stroke: Changes in Emotions - Topic Overview

    Emotional reactions after a stroke may be different from normal emotional reactions.The reaction may have little or no obvious connection with what is happening around the person.Often reactions can be easily interrupted by diverting the person's attention.People who have had a stroke—usually in the front part of the brain or in the brain stem—can lose emotional control and may switch from crying to laughing for no apparent reason.Crying appears to be the most frequent problem. Crying can be a symptom of depression, which is a medical condition that requires treatment. Untreated depression can interfere with recovery. And it can have a significant impact on enjoyment of life. Medicine may be needed to help control emotional responses and treat depression. People who have had a stroke may act differently because they feel isolated and have vision problems. They may:Become irritable, confused, or restless.Sometimes have false beliefs (delusions).Have hallucinations.This is more

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