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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Stroke Rehabilitation - Medicines for Stroke Prevention

    After a stroke and during rehabilitation, you need medicines to help prevent another stroke. You may need medicines to thin your blood and prevent clots from forming and medicines to lower blood pressure and cholesterol.Antiplatelets to prevent clotsAspirin, aspirin with extended - release dipyridamole (Aggrenox), and other antiplateletsAnticoagulants to keep clots from growing and to prevent new

  2. Stroke: Hesitant or Impulsive? - Topic Overview

    Depending on which side of the brain was affected by a stroke, the way a person approaches tasks may be different than it was before the stroke.Stroke on the left side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the left side of the brain tend to be slow, cautious, and disorganized when they are doing unfamiliar activities. They appear anxious and hesitant, which is often quite different from the way they were before the stroke.It may be helpful to offer reassurance or words of encouragement. But don't praise someone for imaginary progress.Offer praise after each step in a task. Allow time for self-correction of mistakes. If the person cannot correct the mistake, point out the error and give a hint.Stroke on the right side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the right side of the brain tend to be impulsive and act too quickly. They may act as if they are unaware of their problems. They often try to do things that are beyond their abilities and that may be unsafe, such as

  3. Stroke - Topic Overview

    What is a stroke? A stroke occurs when a blood vessel (artery) that supplies blood to the brain bursts or is blocked by a blood clot. Within minutes, the nerve cells in that area of the brain are damaged, and they may die within a few hours.

  4. Stroke Guide - What Increases Your Risk

    Read about diseases or conditions that may make stroke more likely.

  5. Hemorrhagic Stroke - Topic Overview

    A hemorrhagic stroke develops when a blood vessel (artery) in the brain leaks or bursts (ruptures). This causes bleeding: Inside the brain tissue (intracerebral hemorrhage). Near the surface of the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage or subdural hemorrhage ). A common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage is the rupture of an aneurysm. Hemorrhagic strokes are not as common as strokes caused by a blood ...

  6. Stroke and TIA: Who Is Affected - Topic Overview

    About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

  7. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Cause

    Blood clots that temporarily block blood flow to the brain are the most common cause of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

  8. Stroke: Your Rehabilitation Team - Topic Overview

    Rehabilitation after a stroke usually involves a number of health professionals. These may include the following people.Doctors and nursesRehabilitation doctor. The rehabilitation doctor is in charge of your medical care after a stroke. This may be a physiatrist (a doctor who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation), a neurologist, or a primary care doctor.Rehabilitation nurse. A rehabilitation nurse specializes in nursing care for people with disabilities. He or she can provide nursing care and helps doctors coordinate medical care. A rehabilitation nurse can also educate both you and your family about recovering from a stroke.Rehabilitation therapistsPhysical therapist. A physical therapist evaluates and treats problems with movement, balance, and coordination. The physical therapist can provide you with training and exercises to improve walking, getting into and out of bed or a chair, and moving around without losing your balance. The physical therapist also teaches

  9. Stroke Guide - Medications

    It is very important to seek emergency medical attention for stroke symptoms. If you are having an ischemic stroke, which is caused by a blood clot, you may be able to receive tissue plasminogen activator (t - PA), a clot - dissolving medication. It is no

  10. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Other Treatment

    A brief description of carotid artery stenting to help prevent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke.

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