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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - When To Call a Doctor

    Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if you have possible signs of a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).

  2. Stroke: Your Rehabilitation Team - Topic Overview

    Rehabilitation after a stroke usually involves a number of health professionals. These may include the following people.Doctors and nursesRehabilitation doctor. The rehabilitation doctor is in charge of your medical care after a stroke. This may be a physiatrist (a doctor who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation), a neurologist, or a primary care doctor.Rehabilitation nurse. A rehabilitation nurse specializes in nursing care for people with disabilities. He or she can provide nursing care and helps doctors coordinate medical care. A rehabilitation nurse can also educate both you and your family about recovering from a stroke.Rehabilitation therapistsPhysical therapist. A physical therapist evaluates and treats problems with movement, balance, and coordination. The physical therapist can provide you with training and exercises to improve walking, getting into and out of bed or a chair, and moving around without losing your balance. The physical therapist also teaches

  3. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

    What is a transient ischemic attack (TIA)? Some people call a transient ischemic attack (TIA) a mini - stroke, because the symptoms are like those of a stroke but do not last long.

  4. Stroke Rehabilitation - Medicines for Stroke Rehabilitation

    After a stroke, you may need medicines to decrease pain, treat depression, or help speed your recovery. These may include: Medicines for pain and depression after a stroke. Examples are: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for pain and depression.Tricyclic antidepressants for pain and depression.Anticonvulsant medicines for pain.Medicines for sleeping. After a stroke, you may have ...

  5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Symptoms

    Learn the symptoms of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

  6. Stroke: Changes in Emotions - Topic Overview

    Emotional reactions after a stroke may be different from normal emotional reactions.The reaction may have little or no obvious connection with what is happening around the person.Often reactions can be easily interrupted by diverting the person's attention.People who have had a stroke—usually in the front part of the brain or in the brain stem—can lose emotional control and may switch from crying to laughing for no apparent reason.Crying appears to be the most frequent problem. Crying can be a symptom of depression, which is a medical condition that requires treatment. Untreated depression can interfere with recovery. And it can have a significant impact on enjoyment of life. Medicine may be needed to help control emotional responses and treat depression. People who have had a stroke may act differently because they feel isolated and have vision problems. They may:Become irritable, confused, or restless.Sometimes have false beliefs (delusions).Have hallucinations.This is more

  7. Hemorrhagic Stroke - Topic Overview

    A hemorrhagic stroke develops when a blood vessel (artery) in the brain leaks or bursts (ruptures). This causes bleeding: Inside the brain tissue (intracerebral hemorrhage). Near the surface of the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage or subdural hemorrhage ). A common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage is the rupture of an aneurysm. Hemorrhagic strokes are not as common as strokes caused by a blood ...

  8. Stroke: Getting Dressed - Topic Overview

    A stroke often affects movement and use of one side of the body, so getting dressed is often difficult for people after a stroke.Getting dressed may be easier if you use stocking/sock aids, rings or strings attached to zipper pulls, and buttonhooks. Talk with a nurse or physical therapist about assistive devices that may help you get dressed. Clothing may be easier to put on if it has features such as:Velcro closures.Elastic waistbands and shoelaces.Snaps and grippers.To make getting dressed easier:Lay out your clothes in the order that you will put them on, with those you will put on first on top of the pile.Sit down while you dress.Put your affected arm or leg into the piece of clothing first, before the unaffected arm or leg.Removing clothing that has to go over your head may be difficult. To undress after a stroke has affected an arm or leg, remove the stronger arm or leg from the clothing first, then slip out your affected arm or leg.

  9. Exercising to Prevent a Stroke - Topic Overview

    Exercise helps lower high blood pressure,which is an important risk factor for stroke. Exercise can help you control other things that put you at risk,such as obesity,high cholesterol and diabetes. It is important to exercise regularly. Do activities that raise your heart rate. Try to do at least 2½ hours a week of moderate exercise. One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day,...

  10. Stroke Guide - Cause

    An ischemic stroke is caused by a blood clot that blocks blood flow to the brain.

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