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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Antiplatelet Medicines for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

    Drug details for Antiplatelets for stroke and TIA.

  2. High Blood Pressure, Transient Ischemic Attack, and Stroke - Topic Overview

    High blood pressure (hypertension) is considered the most important and most treatable risk factor for transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke. Proper treatment of high blood pressure can reduce the chance of having a TIA or stroke. High blood pressure increases the pressure inside arteries,causing damage. Excessive pressure on the walls of vessels speeds up hardening and narrowing of the ...

  3. Exercising to Prevent a Stroke - Topic Overview

    Exercise helps lower high blood pressure,which is an important risk factor for stroke. Exercise can help you control other things that put you at risk,such as obesity,high cholesterol and diabetes. It is important to exercise regularly. Do activities that raise your heart rate. Try to do at least 2½ hours a week of moderate exercise. One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day,...

  4. Topic Overview

    Please answer the following questions: Risk of stroke with or without carotid endarterectomy How much carotid stenosis do you have? Have you had symptoms (TIA or mild stroke)? 70% or more Yes No 60–69% Yes No 50–59% Yes No Less than 50% Yes No Don't know Yes No ...

  5. Stroke: Problems With Ignoring the Affected Side - Topic Overview

    Some people who have had a stroke have problems seeing in some or all of the normal areas of vision. For example, people with left-sided paralysis may have difficulty seeing to the left. If the problem is due to a vision loss, most people learn to make up for this loss by turning their heads. If the person does not turn his or her head to the affected side, that side of the body may be ignored or neglected.Caregivers may notice signs that the person is ignoring the affected side, such as:Mentioning or responding to stimulation only on the unaffected side of the body.Using only the unaffected arm or leg.Looking only to the environment on the unaffected side.Noticing only someone who speaks or approaches from the unaffected side of the body.Responding to only half of the objects he or she would normally see, such as eating from just one side of the plate.Not recognizing the affected arm and leg as belonging to his or her body and thinking that they belong to someone else.Thinking that

  6. After a Stroke: Helping Your Family Adjust - Topic Overview

    If you have a family member who has had a stroke, you may be concerned about how the stroke is going to affect your family's lifestyle. You may be concerned about finances and changes in family roles and responsibilities. Here are some ways to help your loved one and other family members adjust: Realize that after a stroke, your loved one may be prone to strong emotional reactions. Remember that these are a result of the stroke. Try not to become too upset by them.Don't avoid your loved one who's had a stroke. Contact with and support from family members is very important to your loved one's recovery.Join a local support group. These groups provide a place where issues can be discussed in a supportive environment and an opportunity to meet others dealing with the same issues. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area.Take care of yourself too. You must stay healthy enough so you can care for your loved one who has had a stroke.You are an important part of your family member's

  7. Stroke: Common Disabilities - Topic Overview

    Stroke is the most common cause of disability resulting from damage to the nervous system. A stroke may affect: Movement. You may not be able to use your arms or walk. This is usually because of weakness or paralysis on one side of the body (hemiparesis). Speech and language. You may not be able to speak,read,or write. Also,you may not be able to understand what someone else is saying. ...

  8. Stroke Symptoms - Topic Overview

    If you have symptoms of a stroke,seek emergency medical care. Symptoms may include: Sudden numbness,tingling,weakness,or paralysis in your face,arm,or leg,especially on only one side of your body. Sudden vision changes. Sudden trouble speaking. Sudden confusion or trouble understanding simple statements. Sudden problems with walking or balance. A sudden,severe headache that is ...

  9. Angiogram of the Head and Neck

    Angiogram of the head and neck is an X-ray test that uses fluoroscopy to take pictures of the blood flow within the blood vessels of the head and neck.

  10. Stroke Rehabilitation - Medicines for Stroke Prevention

    After a stroke and during rehabilitation, you need medicines to help prevent another stroke. You may need medicines to thin your blood and prevent clots from forming and medicines to lower blood pressure and cholesterol.Antiplatelets to prevent clotsAspirin, aspirin with extended - release dipyridamole (Aggrenox), and other antiplateletsAnticoagulants to keep clots from growing and to prevent new

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