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    Stroke Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Stroke

    1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Emotional reactions after a stroke may be different from normal emotional reactions.The reaction may have little or no obvious connection with what is happening around the person.Often reactions can be easily interrupted by diverting the person's attention.People who have had a stroke—usually in the front part of the brain or in the brain stem—can lose emotional control and may switch from crying to laughing for no apparent reason.Crying appears to be the most frequent problem. Crying can be a symptom of depression, which is a medical condition that requires treatment. Untreated depression can interfere with recovery. And it can have a significant impact on enjoyment of life. Medicine may be needed to help control emotional responses and treat depression. People who have had a stroke may act differently because they feel isolated and have vision problems. They may:Become irritable, confused, or restless.Sometimes have false beliefs (delusions).Have hallucinations.This is more

    2. Angiogram of the Head and Neck

      Angiogram of the head and neck is an X-ray test that uses fluoroscopy to take pictures of the blood flow within the blood vessels of the head and neck.

    3. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

    4. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      When a stroke occurs on the right side of the brain,a person's ability to judge distance,size,position,rate of movement,form,and the way parts relate to the whole is affected (spatial-perceptual problems). People with these problems may have more trouble learning to care for themselves. Signs of perception problems are often noticed by the caregiver of a person who has had a stroke. ...

    5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Symptoms

      If you have symptoms of a stroke, seek emergency medical care.

    6. Stroke Guide - Home Treatment

      After a stroke, home treatment will be an important part of your rehabilitation.You may need to use assistive devices to help you eat, get dressed, and walk.

    7. Stroke: Preventing Injury in Affected Limbs - Topic Overview

      Rehabilitation after a stroke usually involves a number of health professionals. These may include the following people.Doctors and nursesRehabilitation doctor. The rehabilitation doctor is in charge of your medical care after a stroke. This may be a physiatrist (a doctor who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation), a neurologist, or a primary care doctor.Rehabilitation nurse. A rehabilitation nurse specializes in nursing care for people with disabilities. He or she can provide nursing care and helps doctors coordinate medical care. A rehabilitation nurse can also educate both you and your family about recovering from a stroke.Rehabilitation therapistsPhysical therapist. A physical therapist evaluates and treats problems with movement, balance, and coordination. The physical therapist can provide you with training and exercises to improve walking, getting into and out of bed or a chair, and moving around without losing your balance. The physical therapist also teaches

    8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Surgery

      information on carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting, surgical procedures to reduce the risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).

    9. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      If you have a family member who has had a stroke, you may be concerned about how the stroke is going to affect your family's lifestyle. You may be concerned about finances and changes in family roles and responsibilities. Here are some ways to help your loved one and other family members adjust: Realize that after a stroke, your loved one may be prone to strong emotional reactions. Remember that these are a result of the stroke. Try not to become too upset by them.Don't avoid your loved one who's had a stroke. Contact with and support from family members is very important to your loved one's recovery.Join a local support group. These groups provide a place where issues can be discussed in a supportive environment and an opportunity to meet others dealing with the same issues. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area.Take care of yourself too. You must stay healthy enough so you can care for your loved one who has had a stroke.You are an important part of your family member's

    10. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Health Tools

      An interactive tool about deciding whether to have carotid endarterectomy for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).

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