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    Stroke Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Stroke

    1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - What Increases Your Risk

      The risk factors for a transient ischemic attack (TIA) are the same as those for a stroke.

    2. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      What is a transient ischemic attack (TIA)? Some people call a transient ischemic attack (TIA) a mini - stroke, because the symptoms are like those of a stroke but do not last long.

    3. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - What Happens

      Find out why a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a warning sign of stroke risk.

    4. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      After you've had a stroke, you may be worried that you could have another one. That's easy to understand. But the good news is that there are things you can do to reduce your risk of having another stroke. Taking medicine, doing stroke rehabilitation, and making healthy lifestyle changes can help.Take your medicinesYou'll need to take medicines to help prevent another stroke. Be sure to take your medicines exactly as prescribed. And don't stop taking them unless your doctor tells you to. If you stop taking your medicines, you can increase your risk of having another stroke.Some of the medicines your doctor may prescribe include:Aspirin and other antiplatelet medicines to prevent blood clots.Anticoagulants to prevent blood clots, especially for people who have atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat).Statins to lower high cholesterol. Statins can even protect against stroke in people who don't have heart disease or high cholesterol.1ACE inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin II

    5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Health Tools

      Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health. Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems.

    6. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Stroke is the most common cause of disability resulting from damage to the nervous system. A stroke may affect: Movement. You may not be able to use your arms or walk. This is usually because of weakness or paralysis on one side of the body (hemiparesis). Speech and language. You may not be able to speak,read,or write. Also,you may not be able to understand what someone else is saying. ...

    7. Stroke Guide - What Happens

      When you have an ischemic stroke, the oxygen-rich blood supply to part of your brain is reduced. With a hemorrhagic stroke, there is bleeding in the brain. After about 4 minutes without blood and oxygen, brain cells become damaged and may die.

    8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Depending on which side of the brain was affected by a stroke, the way a person approaches tasks may be different than it was before the stroke.Stroke on the left side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the left side of the brain tend to be slow, cautious, and disorganized when they are doing unfamiliar activities. They appear anxious and hesitant, which is often quite different from the way they were before the stroke.It may be helpful to offer reassurance or words of encouragement. But don't praise someone for imaginary progress.Offer praise after each step in a task. Allow time for self-correction of mistakes. If the person cannot correct the mistake, point out the error and give a hint.Stroke on the right side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the right side of the brain tend to be impulsive and act too quickly. They may act as if they are unaware of their problems. They often try to do things that are beyond their abilities and that may be unsafe, such as

    9. Stroke Rehabilitation - What to Expect After a Stroke

      Initial disabilitiesYour disabilities and your ability to get better after a stroke depend on: Which side of the brain was affected (whether it is your dominant side).Which part of the brain was damaged by the stroke.How much of the brain was damaged.Your general health before the stroke.Disabilities after a stroke may include problems with muscles and movement. These include:Weakness on one side

    10. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Some people have speech and language problems after a stroke. These problems may involve any or all aspects of language use, such as speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the spoken word. Speech and language problems (aphasia) usually occur when a stroke affects the right side of the body. Trouble communicating can be very frustrating. When you talk to someone who has had a stroke, be patient, understanding, and supportive.The following are tips for helping someone who has speech and language problems:Speak directly to him or her—not to a companion, even if that person is an interpreter—and speak in second, not third, person: How are you feeling today?Maintain eye contact.Speak slowly and simply in a normal tone of voice. People who have speech and language problems are not deaf.Give him or her adequate time to respond.Listen carefully.Focus on what the person is saying, not how he or she is saying it.Don't fill in with a word or sentence unless you are asked.Ask the

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