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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Stroke Rehabilitation - Overview

    Is this topic for you?This topic covers rehabilitation after a stroke. For information on stroke itself, see the topic Stroke.What is stroke rehabilitation?The best way to get better after a stroke is to start stroke rehabilitation (“rehab”). In stroke rehab, a team of health professionals works with you to regain skills you lost as the result of a stroke. Rehab can help you to: Do as well and

  2. Stroke Rehabilitation - What to Expect After a Stroke

    Initial disabilitiesYour disabilities and your ability to get better after a stroke depend on: Which side of the brain was affected (whether it is your dominant side).Which part of the brain was damaged by the stroke.How much of the brain was damaged.Your general health before the stroke.Disabilities after a stroke may include problems with muscles and movement. These include:Weakness on one side

  3. Stroke Rehabilitation - Medicines for Stroke Rehabilitation

    After a stroke, you may need medicines to decrease pain, treat depression, or help speed your recovery. These may include: Medicines for pain and depression after a stroke. Examples are: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for pain and depression.Tricyclic antidepressants for pain and depression.Anticonvulsant medicines for pain.Medicines for sleeping. After a stroke, you may have ...

  4. Stroke Rehabilitation - Adapting After a Stroke

    After a stroke, rehabilitation will not only focus on helping you recover from disabilities but also on making changes in your lifestyle, at home, at work, and in relationships. Changes will depend on the type of disabilities, which are determined by the part of your brain that was affected by the stroke.A stroke in the right side of the brain can cause difficulty with performing everyday tasks. .

  5. Stroke Rehabilitation - Preventing Another Stroke

    There are several factors you cannot change that increase your risk of stroke. But there are also several things that you have some control over which can help you avoid another stroke, including:High blood pressure.Heart disease.High cholesterol.Diabetes.Obesity.Excessive use of alcohol.Use of tobacco products.Too much caffeine.Use of certain illegal drugs, such as cocaine.To prevent another ...

  6. Stroke Rehabilitation - Concerns of the Caregiver

    Taking care of a loved one who has had a stroke can be difficult for many reasons. You may be afraid that your loved one will have another stroke or will not be able to accept or overcome disabilities. You may worry that you are not prepared to care for someone who has just had a stroke, or you may have your own health concerns that make it difficult for you to care for another person. You may ...

  7. Stroke Rehabilitation - Health Tools

    Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems. Should I put my loved one who has had a stroke in a nursing home?Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. Managing eating problems after a stroke ...

  8. 10 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Stroke

    If you've had a stroke, here are some key questions you may want to ask your doctor.

  9. Vascular Dementia

    WebMD details what vascular dementia is and its causes, symptoms, and treatments.

  10. Stroke: Preventing Injury in Affected Limbs - Topic Overview

    After a stroke, you may not feel temperature, touch, pain, or sharpness on your affected side. You may have:Feelings of heaviness, numbness, tingling, or prickling or greater sensitivity on the affected side.No sense of how your muscles and joints are operating together, which may affect your balance.If you cannot feel an object, you may be more likely to hurt yourself.If you have a tendency to clench your fist on the affected arm, keep your fingernails short and smooth so that you do not cut yourself.If you cannot feel sensations in your feet, cut and file your toenails straight across so that you do not scratch yourself.Soaking your hands and feet may make your nails easier to cut. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about the care of your feet.If you cannot feel heat on your affected side, you may be more prone to burns. Tips to prevent burns include the following:Test the temperature of bath water or dishwater using your unaffected side.Bathe and do dishes in lukewarm

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