Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Stroke Health Center

Font Size

Chiropractic Manipulation of Neck: Stroke Risk?

American Heart Association releases statement saying risk may be increased if artery wall is torn

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Aug. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Getting your neck adjusted by a chiropractor or osteopathic doctor may be associated with an increased risk of stroke, according to a scientific statement released Thursday by the American Heart Association.

The energetic thrusts and rotations sometimes used in neck manipulation may cause a small tear in the artery walls in the neck, a condition called cervical artery dissection, the statement noted.

A tear in the artery wall can result in a stroke if a blood clot forms at the site and later breaks free to block a blood vessel in the brain.

Such a tear "occurs with a sudden movement that can hyperextend or rotate the neck, such as one you may see with whiplash or sporting events, or even violent coughing or vomiting," said statement author Dr. Jose Biller, chair of neurology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. "The techniques for cervical manipulation, even though they vary among health professionals, include a rotation of the neck and sometimes a forceful thrust."

These artery wall injuries are an important cause of stroke in young and middle-aged adults, accounting for 8 percent to 25 percent of stroke cases in patients younger than 45, the authors said in background information.

Four large studies have established an association between neck manipulation and stroke in patients 45 and younger, although the evidence does not prove that the practice can directly cause strokes, the paper stated.

Nonetheless, chiropractors and osteopathic physicians ought to warn patients of this link, the statement added.

"We strongly believe that patients should be informed of this association before undergoing neck manipulation," Biller said.

The statement was published in the Aug. 7 online edition of the journal Stroke.

The chiropractic community is aware of the association between neck manipulation and stroke, which is an issue that has simmered for about five years now, said Keith Overland, immediate past president of the American Chiropractic Association and a doctor of chiropractic in Norwalk, Conn.

But Overland said that the evidence remains mixed and inconclusive.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

brain illustration stroke
Know these 5 signs.
brain scans
Test your stroke smarts.
woman with migraine
Is there a link?
brain scan
Get the facts.
brain scans
woman with migraine
brain scan
senior man stretching pre workout
Floor level view of therapist helping stroke patie
concerned woman
Lowering Cholesterol Slideshow