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  • Question 1/10

    ADHD is a learning disability.

  • Answer 1/10

    ADHD is a learning disability.

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    • Correct Answer:

    ADHD, or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, is a common neurodevelopmental disorder, not a learning disability. If your child has ADHD, he can be impulsive or easily distracted and have trouble finishing tasks. Yet, many kids with ADHD have average intelligence. And some may have high IQs. Some kids with ADHD may have learning disabilities; about half do. If you are concerned, have your child checked for this.

  • Question 1/10

    You can make getting ready for school in the morning easier by:

  • Answer 1/10

    You can make getting ready for school in the morning easier by:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Mornings can be hectic, especially if you are rushing off to work. You can ease the stress on your child by establishing a morning routine and posting reminders about what to do using pictures or short notes. Make sure the reminders are simple and clear: 1) alarm rings 2) wash face 3) get dressed. Also try keeping a list of things to take to school by the door or in your child’s backpack.

  • Question 1/10

    Holding a child back in school has been proved to help kids with ADHD.

  • Answer 1/10

    Holding a child back in school has been proved to help kids with ADHD.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Parents of young children with ADHD, particularly kindergartners and first-graders, are often told to keep their child back a year to catch up on social skills or “grow out” of certain behaviors. But research doesn’t support that idea; repeating a grade can affect self-esteem, and boredom can make behavior worse. Most experts suggest moving the child to the next grade and providing access to services.

  • Question 1/10

    How can you help your child’s teacher?

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    How can you help your child’s teacher?

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    • Correct Answer:

    You are your child’s biggest advocate, and it’s important to work with everyone involved in your child’s treatment, including teachers, doctors, therapists, even other family members. Talk to your child’s teacher early in the year, and use a homework folder to communicate. Ask the teacher to include assignments and progress notes, and you can check to make sure all the work is turned in on time.

  • Question 1/10

    Joining an extracurricular club or team can help your child’s:

  • Answer 1/10

    Joining an extracurricular club or team can help your child’s:

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    • Correct Answer:

    It’s important for all kids to feel good about themselves, but a healthy sense of confidence and self-esteem can be particularly vital for children with ADHD, some of whom struggle in school. Help your child find an activity that he or she does well in and encourage participation in it. Sports or art or music classes or activities all can help boost self-esteem and social skills.

  • Answer 1/10

    Where should your child do homework?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Children with ADHD tend to need more structure and respond well to schedules. Pick a regular time and place for homework, away from other people and distractions such as television and video games. Have your child do homework in short time segments, and give him or her plenty of breaks.

  • Question 1/10

    What’s the best way for your child or teen to study for a big test?

  • Answer 1/10

    What’s the best way for your child or teen to study for a big test?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Breaking up a large task into a series of small steps can make it more manageable. That means planning ahead and studying for a big test in short spurts over several days or weeks instead of cramming the night before. Creating questions and then rereading the material to answer the questions is an effective way to remember it. A tutor or study buddy also can help.

  • Question 1/10

    Your child should have diet restrictions at school.

  • Answer 1/10

    Your child should have diet restrictions at school.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This is one area where your child doesn’t have to feel different. Although a balanced diet is important for overall health, children with ADHD do not need to follow a restricted diet; research has yet to find that following a specific diet helps or cures ADHD. Although diets advocating cutting out gluten, sugar, food additives, and yeast gained some attention, more studies are needed to determine whether any of these eliminations help children with ADHD.

  • Question 1/10

    Under an individualized education program, or IEP, your child might:

  • Answer 1/10

    Under an individualized education program, or IEP, your child might:

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    • Correct Answer:

    By law, public schools must provide children with ADHD “free, appropriate public education.” Some children with ADHD are eligible for an individualized education program (IEP) that sets goals and provides support needed to achieve them. An IEP could include modified testing and homework deadlines, provide a note-taking partner, and allow the student to run errands for the teacher to burn energy.

  • Question 1/10

    I’m worried my child may be having side effects from meds. I should:

  • Answer 1/10

    I’m worried my child may be having side effects from meds. I should:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you feel that your child’s ADHD meds are causing side effects -- which can include decreased appetite, upset stomach, mood changes, and disrupted sleep -- talk to your doctor. He may change the dosage, recommend a different drug, or suggest taking a break from medication.   

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Sources | Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on November 07, 2018 Medically Reviewed on November 07, 2018

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on
November 07, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: “ADHD Parents Medication Guide,” “What is ADHD?”

CDC: “ADHD, Treatment.”

FamilyDoctor.org: “Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder -- Treatment.”

Healthychildren.org: “ADHD, Good Habits for Academic Success,” “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder,” “Health Issues: ADHD, Daily Routines and Rhythms,” “Holding a Child Back in School Because of ADHD,” “Your Child’s Diet: A Cause and a Cure of ADHD.”

Kaplan, B. Journal of Learning Disabilities , September 2000.

Kidshealth.org: “Causes of ADHD,” “ADHD in the Classroom.”

National Alliance on Mental Illness: “ADHD and School: Helping Your Child Succeed in the Classroom.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.”

University of Michigan Health System: “ADHD: What Parents Need to Know.”

U.S. Office of Special Education Programs: “Identifying and Treating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Resource for School and Home.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.