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  • Answer 1/14

    Kids who have ADHD mainly need:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you worry your child has ADHD, it is best to get him checked out by his doctor. ADHD doesn't happen because of a lack of willpower or lack of discipline. While providing clear, consistent expectations, setting limits, and keeping a daily schedule can help kids with ADHD, it is a medical disorder. Seeking out medical advice can help you and your child better manage it.

     

    Even though we don't understand exactly what causes ADHD, we do know that genetics and brain chemistry are involved.

  • Question 1/14

    All children with ADHD are hyperactive.

  • Answer 1/14

    All children with ADHD are hyperactive.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Not all kids with ADHD are restless or hyper. There are actually three types of ADHD:

     

    Predominantly inattentive-- These kids have problems focusing, are distracted easily, and have trouble following directions or conversations.

     

    Predominantly hyperactive-impulsive-- These kids fidget, talk a lot, are impulsive and/or accident-prone, and can't wait for their turn.

     

    Combined-- These kids have traits from both types. This is the most common.

  • Question 1/14

    Among school-age children, who is diagnosed more with ADHD?

  • Answer 1/14

    Among school-age children, who is diagnosed more with ADHD?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    More than twice as many boys ages 4 to 17 are diagnosed with ADHD -- 13.2% of boys compared to 5.6% of girls.

     

    Girls, though, are more likely to have the predominantly inattentive type of ADHD. Girls' ADHD may be overlooked because their lack of attention is often mistaken for daydreaming and not recognized until they get older. Girls also tend to be less disruptive and less likely to have a learning disability, the red flags teachers often watch for.

  • Question 1/14

    All fidgety kids have ADHD.

  • Answer 1/14

    All fidgety kids have ADHD.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    What can seem like ADHD symptoms are sometimes just typical kid behaviors. Fidgeting, lack of organization, and inability to listen or follow instructions -- they aren't always symptoms of ADHD.

    To diagnose ADHD, some of the things doctors look for include:

    • Six symptoms of inattentiveness and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity are required for individuals younger than 17 years old, but only five symptoms are needed for 17 and older.
    • ADHD symptoms that affect kids in at least two places, like home, school, or social situations
    • Symptoms for 6 months or more

     

    the minimum age that symptoms need to be present is 12 years old. If you're concerned about ADHD, schedule an appointment with your child's doctor so you can get it checked out.

  • Question 1/14

    What percentage of kids are diagnosed with ADHD?

  • Answer 1/14

    What percentage of kids are diagnosed with ADHD?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    As of 2011, 11% of 4- to 17-year-olds were reportedly diagnosed with ADHD. That's up from 9.5% in 2007.

     

    It's not clear whether more kids are developing ADHD, or if more are being diagnosed because of better ways to identify it.

  • Question 1/14

    ADD and ADHD are the same thing.

  • Answer 1/14

    ADD and ADHD are the same thing.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    For years, "attention deficit disorder" (ADD) was the term used for a certain type of attention problem.

     

    Today, professionals use "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder," or ADHD, as the umbrella term. There are different subtypes under it. Now, ADD is one of those that usually falls under ADHD. ADD is also known as the "predominantly inattentive" type.

  • Question 1/14

    What's the youngest age ADHD can be diagnosed?

  • Answer 1/14

    What's the youngest age ADHD can be diagnosed?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    New findings make it possible for doctors to make a diagnosis as early as 4, according to American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. Before 2011, the youngest age a child could be diagnosed was 6.

     

    Getting an early diagnosis may help kids start therapies that can improve their odds of success at school.

  • Question 1/14

    Which condition is sometimes seen along with ADHD?

  • Answer 1/14

    Which condition is sometimes seen along with ADHD?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    About two-thirds of children with ADHD also have other conditions or illnesses, such as:

    • a learning disability
    • anxiety
    • depression
    • oppositional defiant disorder
    • conduct disorder
    • delays in learning or language development

     

    These other conditions can make it more difficult to diagnose ADHD.

  • Question 1/14

    Kids usually outgrow ADHD by what age?

  • Answer 1/14

    Kids usually outgrow ADHD by what age?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The latest thinking is many kids don't outgrow ADHD. About half of kids with ADHD have symptoms as teens and young adults.

     

    Some traits of ADHD, like high energy, can be assets in certain careers. Most importantly, with treatment, kids with ADHD can learn to manage symptoms as they get older.

  • Answer 1/14

    ADHD is often treated with:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Typical ADHD treatment has several parts. Between 70% and 80% of children with ADHD respond to stimulant medication. But all stimulants don't work for all kids with ADHD. Several types may need to be tried before you can find the one that works the best.

     

    Behavioral modification, and often, psychological therapy, can teach a child new skills to help him manage his own behavior and interact well with others.

     

    Parents and other caretakers should also learn about ADHD. Learning how to set up systems of rewards and consequences can help your child. It's also important to learn how to manage the stress ADHD can cause you and your child. Family therapy is sometimes part of a treatment program, too.

  • Question 1/14

    Why are stimulant medications part of ADHD treatment?

  • Answer 1/14

    Why are stimulant medications part of ADHD treatment?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It may seem odd to give stimulants (Adderall, Adderall XR, Concerta, Focalin, Folcalin XR, Mydayis, Ritalin, Vyvanse) to treat a condition that may feature hyped-up behavior. But these drugs stimulate the parts of the brain needed for impulse control, focus, and organization.

     

    While there's no cure for ADHD, stimulants seem to do a good job of controlling some symptoms for most kids.

  • Question 1/14

    Which diet is best for a child with ADHD?

  • Answer 1/14

    Which diet is best for a child with ADHD?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The Mediterranean diet is a good choice, but only because it promotes the kind of foods that are healthiest for ALL kids. There's no proof that ADHD can be caused by a poor diet or cured by a special diet.

     

    Health experts agree every child does better in general by eating a balanced diet like the Mediterranean diet.

     

    Eat-- mostly fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and omega-3 fats (found in foods like salmon and walnuts).

     

    Avoid-- saturated fats, sugar, and additives or processed foods.

  • Question 1/14

    Schools and teachers can diagnose ADHD.

  • Answer 1/14

    Schools and teachers can diagnose ADHD.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Teachers, aides, and principals aren't qualified to diagnose ADHD. They may point out problems because they've seen similar things in kids they know have ADHD.

     

    That can be helpful, but you need to talk with a health care provider who is trained to diagnose ADHD to find out for sure and get proper treatment.

  • Question 1/14

    How can a kid with ADHD focus on video games for hours on end?

  • Answer 1/14

    How can a kid with ADHD focus on video games for hours on end?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Although inattention is a classic ADHD symptom, kids with ADHD can focus on stimulating activities. Activities that are full of images, sounds, or physical activity can hold their attention.

     

    It's not because kids with ADHD can turn their attention on and off when they want. Rather, they have a harder time paying attention in certain situations.

     

    Tasks that require focused attention over long periods of time -- such as schoolwork or lectures -- are usually harder.

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Sources | Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on August 05, 2017 Medically Reviewed on August 05, 2017

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on
August 05, 2017

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ADHDLibrary.org: "Comparison of ADHD Subtypes."

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Biederman, J. The American Journal of Psychiatry , June 1, 2005.

National Center for Learning Disabilities: "What Is Executive Function?"

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Pruitt, D. Your Adolescent , Harper Collins, 2000.

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The Help Group: "ADHD as Executive Function Impairments."

Webster's New World Medical Dictionary: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder."

Wolraich, M. Journal of the American Medical Association , Nov. 22-29, 1995.

Swanson, J. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry , 2003.

Singer-Leshinsky, S. Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants , March 2011.

Kessler, R. American Journal of Psychiatry , April 2006.

Sciutto, M. Journal of Attention Disorders , September 2007.

CDC: "ADHD Symptoms and Diagnosis," "Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Data & Statistics," "Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder," "Facts About ADHD," "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Nov. 12, 2010."

CHADD.org: "What Are the Symptoms of ADHD?" "Ask the Expert: Diet and AD/HD," "Coexisting Disorders," "Understanding ADHD."

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition . American Psychiatric Association, 2000.

Froehlich, T. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine , September 2007.

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