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What is frontotemporal dementia (FTD)?

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Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) is a form of dementia that involves the loss of nerve cells in the front and side areas of your brain -- behind your forehead and ears. Personality and behavior changes and trouble with language are the main symptoms. Some people also have a hard time with writing and comprehension.

Symptoms usually show up around age 60 -- earlier than they usually start with Alzheimer’s disease. Types of frontotemporal dementia include behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD), primary progressive aphasia, Pick's disease, corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: “Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease,” “Frontotemporal Dementia,” “Type of Dementia,” “What is Alzheimer’s?”

Alzheimer’s Disease International: “World Alzheimer’s Report 2015.”

Alzheimer’s Society: “Sight, perception and hallucinations in dementia.”

BrightFocus Foundation: “What’s The Difference Between Dementia & Alzheimer’s Disease?”

Dementia Society of America: “Dementia FAQs.”

Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation: “Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s.”

Visiting Nurse Association of Ohio: “Alzheimer’s Versus Dementia.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on December 26, 2016

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: “Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease,” “Frontotemporal Dementia,” “Type of Dementia,” “What is Alzheimer’s?”

Alzheimer’s Disease International: “World Alzheimer’s Report 2015.”

Alzheimer’s Society: “Sight, perception and hallucinations in dementia.”

BrightFocus Foundation: “What’s The Difference Between Dementia & Alzheimer’s Disease?”

Dementia Society of America: “Dementia FAQs.”

Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation: “Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s.”

Visiting Nurse Association of Ohio: “Alzheimer’s Versus Dementia.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on December 26, 2016

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What is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)?

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