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What are the odds of getting pregnant?

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For most couples trying to conceive, the odds that a woman will become pregnant are 15% to 25% in any particular month. But there are some things that can affect your chance of getting pregnant:

  • Age. After you reach age 30, your chances of conceiving in any given month fall, and they decrease as you age, dropping steeply in your 40s.
  • Irregular menstrual cycles. Having an irregular cycle makes it tricky to calculate when you're ovulating, thus making it difficult to know the ideal time to have sex.
  • Frequency of sex. The less often you have sex, the less likely you are to get pregnant.
  • Amount of time you've been trying to conceive. If you haven't gotten pregnant after one year of trying to conceive, your chances of becoming pregnant may be lower. Talk to your doctor about tests for female and male infertility.
  • Illnesses or medical conditions can affect pregnancy.

From: Getting Started on Getting Pregnant WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

BabyMed. 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health. 

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on January 11, 2018

SOURCES: 

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

BabyMed. 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health. 

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on January 11, 2018

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What are safe over-the-counter allergy medications to take during pregnancy?

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