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  • Question 1/7

    Who are more likely to have a better sense of touch?

  • Answer 1/7

    Who are more likely to have a better sense of touch?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Women tend to have smaller fingers than men. And people with daintier digits feel things more, one study shows. It might be because smaller fingertips have more closely spaced nerve endings.

  • Question 1/7

    How many nerve endings for touch are in each fingertip?

  • Answer 1/7

    How many nerve endings for touch are in each fingertip?

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    The fingers, along with the tongue and lips, are the most sensitive body parts. Despite its large size, the torso is the least sensitive -- the entire thing has about as many touch receptors as a tiny fingertip.

  • Question 1/7

    Other people’s skin usually feels softer to you than your own.

  • Answer 1/7

    Other people’s skin usually feels softer to you than your own.

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    • Correct Answer:

    A series of studies have shown this over and over, whether the other person’s skin is softer or not. Researchers think this makes us more likely to build emotional bonds through touch.

  • Question 1/7

    People can communicate emotions through touch what percent of the time?

  • Answer 1/7

    People can communicate emotions through touch what percent of the time?

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    • Correct Answer:

    It’s slightly better odds than flipping a coin. Volunteers for one study tried to convey eight distinct emotions -- anger, fear, disgust, love, gratitude, sympathy, happiness, and sadness -- to a blindfolded stranger solely through touch. They were successful at least half the time on average.

  • Question 1/7

    Your sense of touch gets sharper with age.

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    Your sense of touch gets sharper with age.

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    • Correct Answer:

    By the time you hit your 70s, your supply of touch receptors is cut in half -- from 50 per square millimeter of skin at age 10.

  • Question 1/7

    Children who aren’t touched enough as infants may have problems learning. 

  • Answer 1/7

    Children who aren’t touched enough as infants may have problems learning. 

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    • Correct Answer:

    They may also grow more slowly and get sick more often. Studies also show skin-to-skin touch helps babies feel more secure. And it’s the basis for strong bonding between parents and child.

  • Question 1/7

    Which type of contact makes a team stronger?

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    Which type of contact makes a team stronger?

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    • Correct Answer:

    When researchers studied NBA teams during the 2008–09 season, they found that those who touched the most also won the most. How do chest bumps and team huddles improve performance? Researchers say touch might instill trust and boost cooperation, making players play better for one another.

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    Great job! You’ve got the golden touch!

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    Not bad! You’re in touch with this sense.

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    Good try, but you could stand to get a better handle on your sense of touch.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on May 25, 2016 Medically Reviewed on May 25, 2016

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
May 25, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Kactus / Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

Ardiel, E. Paediatric Child Health , March 2010.

Field, T. Developmental Review , 2010.

Gentsch, A. Current Biology. 2015.

Hertenstein, M. Emotion , August 2009.

John Hopkins Magazine: “A Primer on Touch.”

Kraus, M. Emotion , October 2010.

National Center for Biotechnology Information: “The communication of emotion via touch.”

Peters, R. The Journal of Neuroscience. 2009.

Scientific American: “How Important Is Physical Contact with Your Infant?”

Urban Child Institute: “Enhancing Development Through the Sense of Touch,” “Touch: Babies’ First Language.”

 

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