PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

If I have cervical cancer, will my daughter have it too?

ANSWER

It's possible to pass an increased risk of cervical cancer to your daughter, but it's not likely. Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), not genetic mutations.

Doctors do think, however, that cervical cancer may run in some families. So if you have it, your daughter is 2 to 3 times more likely to have it than someone whose mother did not. This could be because women in the same family are more likely to have a condition that makes it harder for them to fight HPV.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Can I get another cancer after having cervical cancer?” “What is cancer recurrence?”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Fertility preservation in women with early-stage cervical cancer (Beyond the Basics).”

The Tech Museum of Innovation: “Ask a Geneticist: Is cervical cancer hereditary?”

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Cervical Cancer Screening.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on October 20, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Can I get another cancer after having cervical cancer?” “What is cancer recurrence?”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Fertility preservation in women with early-stage cervical cancer (Beyond the Basics).”

The Tech Museum of Innovation: “Ask a Geneticist: Is cervical cancer hereditary?”

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Cervical Cancer Screening.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on October 20, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

Will cervical cancer affect my sex drive?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: