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What are the results of ear candling?

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Fans say that as the candle burns, it creates a low-level suction force that pulls wax and debris out of your ear. Others believe heat from the candle melts and softens the wax, which falls out over the next few days.

When you’re done, split the candle open and check out at all the nasty stuff inside -- wax, bacteria, and debris from inside your ear.

Ear candlers believe that passages in your head are all connected. Clearing the ear canal, they say, will clean out the rest of the pathways and leave you with a clean head.

From: What Is Ear Candling? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Rafferty, J. , December 2007. Canadian Family Physician

Health Canada: “Ear Candling.”

Seely, D.R. , October 1996. Laryngoscope

Drugstore.com.

FDA: “Don’t Get Burned: Stay Away from Ear Candles.”

American Academy of Audiology: “Ear Candles and Candling: Ineffective and Dangerous.”

Harvard Health Review: “Got an Ear Full? Here’s some advice.”

Ernst, E. , published online, March 2006. Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 14, 2018

SOURCES:

Rafferty, J. , December 2007. Canadian Family Physician

Health Canada: “Ear Candling.”

Seely, D.R. , October 1996. Laryngoscope

Drugstore.com.

FDA: “Don’t Get Burned: Stay Away from Ear Candles.”

American Academy of Audiology: “Ear Candles and Candling: Ineffective and Dangerous.”

Harvard Health Review: “Got an Ear Full? Here’s some advice.”

Ernst, E. , published online, March 2006. Journal of Laryngology and Otology

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 14, 2018

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