Uses

What is Mounjaro used for?

Mounjaro is used to help lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes

Mounjaro may also be used for other conditions as determined by your healthcare provider.

How does Mounjaro work (mechanism of action)?

Mounjaro works to help keep your blood sugar levels from getting too high. Mounjaro works in the following ways to lower your blood sugar.

  • Increases the amount of insulin in your body when your blood sugar (glucose) levels are getting higher. (Insulin is a hormone that helps your body use glucose as a source of energy.)
  • Prevents your liver from releasing stored sugar.
  • Slows the absorption of things you eat and drink.

How is Mounjaro supplied (dosage forms)?

Mounjaro is available in the following dosage forms that are injected under the skin.

  • 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 7.5 mg, 10 mg, 12.5 mg, 15 mg solution for injection, prefilled pens
  • 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 7.5 mg, 10 mg, 12.5 mg, 15 mg solution for injection, vials

How should I store Mounjaro?

Mounjaro should be stored in the original packaging (to keep it protected from light) in the refrigerator, between 36 F to 46 F (2 C to 8 C). Mounjaro can be exposed to temperatures up to 86 F (30 C), for no more than 21 days.

Side Effects

What are the most common side effects of Mounjaro?

The most common side effects of Mounjaro are listed below. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of these side effects that bother you.

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Decreased appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Upset stomach or stomach pain

There may be other side effects of Mounjaro that are not listed here. Contact your healthcare provider if you think you are having a side effect of a medicine. In the U.S., you can report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/medwatch or by calling 800-FDA-1088. In Canada, you can report side effects to Health Canada at www.health.gc.ca/medeffect or by calling 866-234-2345.

What are the serious side effects of Mounjaro?

While less common, the most serious side effects of Mounjaro are described below, along with what to do if they happen.

Severe Allergic Reactions. Mounjaro may cause allergic reactions, which can be serious. Stop using Mounjaro and get help right away if you have any of the following symptoms of a serious allergic reaction.

  • Breathing problems or wheezing
  • Racing heart
  • Fever or general ill feeling
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue, or throat
  • Trouble swallowing or throat tightness
  • Itching, skin rash, or pale red bumps on the skin called hives
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness, feeling lightheaded, or fainting
  • Stomach cramps
  • Joint pain

Thyroid Tumors. Mounjaro may cause you to develop thyroid tumors. Some of these tumors could be cancerous. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you notice any of the following symptoms of a thyroid tumor.

  • Swelling or a lump in your neck
  • Hoarseness
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Trouble breathing

Inflammation of the Pancreas (Pancreatitis). Mounjaro may cause inflammation of the pancreas, which is called pancreatitis. Stop taking Mounjaro and call your healthcare provider right away if you have symptoms of pancreatitis including vomiting or severe pain in the upper part of your belly that travels to your back.

Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia). When used with insulin or other diabetes medicines that increase your body’s insulin levels, Mounjaro can cause low blood sugar. The doses of your other diabetes medicines may need to be changed when taken with Mounjaro. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms of low blood sugar.

  • Headache
  • Crankiness or anxiety
  • Hunger
  • Dizziness or confusion
  • Blurry vision
  • Slurred speech
  • Sweating
  • Feeling jittery or shakiness
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Seizures

Kidney Damage. Kidney damage can happen when using Mounjaro, especially if you are dehydrated (can happen if you aren’t drinking enough water or with severe vomiting or diarrhea). Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms of kidney damage.

  • Reduced need to pee
  • Swelling in your feet, ankles, or legs
  • Weakness or unusual tiredness
  • Difficulty catching your breath or chest pain/pressure
  • Confusion
  • Nausea
  • Seizures

Severe Stomach Problems. Severe stomach problems can happen with Mounjaro. Call your healthcare provider if you have any of the following severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Vision Changes (Diabetic Retinopathy). If you have diabetic retinopathy, your vision changes may get worse with Mounjaro. Call your healthcare provider if you notice any of the following vision changes (new or getting worse).

  • Loss of central vision, which is used to read or dive
  • Not being able to see colors
  • Blurry vision
  • Holes or black spots in your vision
  • Floaters, or small spots in your vision caused by bleeding

Gallbladder Problems (Cholelithiasis). Gallbladder problems can happen with Mounjaro. Call your healthcare provider right away if you notice any of the following symptoms of gallbladder problems.

  • Stomach pain
  • Fever
  • Pale-colored stool
  • Yellowing of your skin or eyes

Warnings & Precautions

Who should not use Mounjaro?

Allergies to Ingredients. People who are allergic to any of the following should not use Mounjaro.

  • Mounjaro
  • Zepbound
  • Tirzepatide
  • Any of the ingredients in the specific product dispensed

Your pharmacist can tell you all of the ingredients in Mounjaro.

Medullary Thyroid Cancer (MTC). People who have had (or a family member who has had) MTC should not use Mounjaro.

Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndrome Type 2 (MEN-2). People with MEN-2 (a rare genetic condition causing tumors of the parathyroid, adrenal, and thyroid glands causing your body to produce large amounts of hormones) should not use Mounjaro.

Type 1 Diabetes. Mounjaro is not used to treat type 1 diabetes.

What should I know about Mounjaro before using it?

Do not use Mounjaro unless it has been prescribed to you by a healthcare provider. Use it as prescribed.

Do not share Mounjaro with other people, even if they have the same condition as you. It may harm them.

Keep Mounjaro out of the reach of children. Since this medicine must be kept in a refrigerator, take special precautions to keep it away from children who also use the refrigerator.

It is not known if you can use Mounjaro if you have ever had pancreatitis.

If you also use insulin, you should not mix the insulin with Mounjaro in the same syringe or injection device. You can use the same area of your body to inject separate insulin and Mounjaro doses, but the injection sites should not be right next to each other.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before using Mounjaro?

Tell your healthcare provider about all of your health conditions and any prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, vitamins/minerals, herbal products, and other supplements you are using. This will help them determine if Mounjaro is right for you.

In particular, make sure that you discuss any of the following.

Current or Past Medical Conditions.

Pregnancy. It is not known if or how Mounjaro could affect pregnancy or harm an unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you are or plan to become pregnant.

Breastfeeding. It is not known if Mounjaro passes into breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

How can I get more information about Mounjaro?

For more information about Mounjaro, you can visit the manufacturer’s website at https://mounjaro.lilly.com/ or call them at 833-807-6576.

Interactions

Does Mounjaro interact with foods or drinks?

It is unknown if drinking alcohol will affect Mounjaro, but alcohol may affect blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This may interfere with the effect of Mounjaro. It is best to limit the amount of alcohol you drink.

Does Mounjaro interact with other medicines (drug interactions)?

Always tell your healthcare provider about any prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, vitamines, minerals, herbal products, and other supplements you are using.

Mounjaro may affect the absorption of some other medicines. Tell your healthcare provider about all medicines that you take or have recently taken. In particular, make sure you tell your healthcare provider if you take birth control pills.

Make sure that you tell your healthcare provider about any medicines you take to treat diabetes, especially insulin or medicines that increase your insulin levels (see risk of low blood sugar above).

Does Mounjaro (tirzepatide) interact with other drugs you are taking?
Enter your medication into the WebMD interaction checker

Overdose/Missed Dose

What should I do if I accidentally use too much Mounjaro?

If you or someone else has used too much Mounjaro, get medical help right away, call 911, or contact a Poison Control center at 800-222-1222.

What should I do if I miss a dose of Mounjaro?

If you miss a dose of Mounjaro and it is less than 4 days (96 hours) from when you should have used it, use Mounjaro as soon as you remember it. If it has been more than 4 days (96 hours) from when you should have used it, skip the missed dose of Mounjaro and use it at your next scheduled dose. You should not take 2 doses of Mounjaro within 3 days (72 hours) of each other.

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