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  • Question 1/9

    To keep your brain sharp:

  • Answer 1/9

    To keep your brain sharp:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    To lower your risk of Alzheimer's disease, flex your gray matter by solving a crossword puzzle or reading a book. But make sure you also get up and move.

     

    Research shows that almost any moderate exercise (like walking, swimming, or biking) lowers the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). That's a condition that often happens before Alzheimer's disease. People with MCI get Alzheimer's at a rate 10 times higher than the general population.

  • Question 1/9

    The earlier you retire, the better.

  • Answer 1/9

    The earlier you retire, the better.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    People who retire in their early 60s may not be as healthy as those who stay in the workforce. Those who keep working part-time or as a temp tend to have fewer major diseases and better mental health.

     

    Experts don't know exactly how work or even a particular job helps you stay sharper. But having somewhere to be, something to do, and being social may have something to do with it. And you’ll have a little more money for your nest egg.

  • Question 1/9

    How much longer does retirement last today than it did in the 1960s?

  • Answer 1/9

    How much longer does retirement last today than it did in the 1960s?

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    • Correct Answer:

    On average, men today will be retired for about 18 years. Guys who retired in the 1960s could expect to enjoy less than half of that. The reason? Americans still retire around the same age, but we're living longer overall.

  • Question 1/9

    How many people say retirement means less sex?

  • Answer 1/9

    How many people say retirement means less sex?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Even though you're ready to retire, it doesn't mean you're too old for sex. While some people report a dip, it isn't huge.

     

    It seems to affect men more than women. Twenty five percent of men say they have less sex than before. Only 19% of women say the same. To keep your love life healthy, use some of your newfound time to reconnect with your partner. Find activities you can enjoy together that can breathe new passion into your relationship.

  • Question 1/9

    Babysitting grandkids is bad for your health.

  • Answer 1/9

    Babysitting grandkids is bad for your health.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Go ahead and offer to watch your grandchildren if you enjoy spending time with them.

     

    While caring for youngsters can cause health problems for some grandparents, it's not always the case. People who see their health decline as a result of caring for their grandkids are the exception, not the rule.

  • Question 1/9

    Most people want to move to a new place when they retire.

  • Answer 1/9

    Most people want to move to a new place when they retire.

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    • Correct Answer:

    The AARP says 9 in 10 Americans plan to stay put when they retire. But if you're thinking of moving, you might want to consider health care, chances for volunteering and part-time work, and the art and culture scene.

     

    There are many online rankings and tools that can help you choose your best retirement city.

  • Question 1/9

    How many retirees want to move closer to their family?

  • Answer 1/9

    How many retirees want to move closer to their family?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You might be surprised, but when it comes to retirement, only 32% of people over 55 want to move within 20 miles of their kids and grandkids.

     

    It's really a matter of personal choice. Some people look forward to being closer to their family, but others prefer the adventure of finding new social circles.

  • Question 1/9

    Most people become less physically active after they retire.

  • Answer 1/9

    Most people become less physically active after they retire.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Even if you haven't been as active as you'd like during your working years, that doesn't mean you can't get moving after retirement. In general, people actually tend to become more active after they retire.

     

    In one study, women added more than half an our to their workout time each week. Men increased their activity by 42 minutes a week. So get up, get out there, and enjoy! Exercise not only feels good, it's good for your health.

  • Question 1/9

    After retirement, people tend to drink:

  • Answer 1/9

    After retirement, people tend to drink:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can sleep in. You have more free time during the day. Having that extra glass of wine sounds like a good idea. Right?

     

    While at least one survey found that retirees tend to drink more and heavily, it doesn't mean you should. For your health, try to stick to just one drink a day for women and two for men.

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Sources | Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on September 14, 2016 Medically Reviewed on September 14, 2016

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on
September 14, 2016

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

AARP: "Best Places for Low Cost Retirement," "Exclusive New Survey From AARP: The Magazine Looks At Effect Of Retirement On Marriage."

American Psychological Association: "People who work after retiring enjoy better health, according to national study."

CBS Moneywatch: "Boomer Retirement Housing Preferences Shifting."

The Economist : "Golden Years: Time Spent in Retirement Has Sharply Increased."

Forbes : "The 25 Best Places to Retire in 2012."

Geda, Y.E. Archives of Neurology , 2010.

Hughes, M. Journals of Gerontology: Series B , March 2007.

Lahti, J. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2011.

The Milken Institute: "Best Cities for Successful Aging."

The New York Times : "Taking Early Retirement May Retire Memory, Too."

News release, University of California at Berkeley.

Rohwedder, S. Journal of Economic Perspectives , 2010.

Social Security Administration: "The Full Retirement Age Is Increasing."

Zins, M. PLoS ONE , 2011.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.