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  • Question 1/12

    Irritable bowel syndrome is most common among …

  • Answer 1/12

    Irritable bowel syndrome is most common among …

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    Two-thirds of North Americans with IBS are female. In all, it affects 25 million to 45 million people in the U.S. It’s so widespread that, according to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, only the common cold is responsible for more time missed at work.

  • Question 1/12

    What percentage of Americans have IBS?

  • Answer 1/12

    What percentage of Americans have IBS?

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    Of those with IBS in the U.S., only about 15% actually get medical treatment for it. Most people who have IBS are under the age of 50. Some are kids.

  • Question 1/12

    IBS and inflammatory bowel disease are different names for the same condition.

  • Answer 1/12

    IBS and inflammatory bowel disease are different names for the same condition.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    With IBD, the immune system attacks the gut and can damage tissue. IBS is a problem with how the gut, the brain, and the nervous system work together.

  • Question 1/12

    You can get IBS from something you ate.

  • Answer 1/12

    You can get IBS from something you ate.

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    • Correct Answer:

    IBS is lifelong for many people. But some people can trace their condition back to a bout of food poisoning or traveler’s diarrhea. Those folks have something called post-infection IBS. Bacteria like salmonella cause it. About 60% of those who get this kind of IBS have it for less than 5 years.

  • Answer 1/12

    What causes IBS?

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    Stress, depression, and diet can make your symptoms worse. They can even trigger them. But doctors aren’t sure what actually causes people to have IBS.

  • Question 1/12

    A doctor will give you a test to see if you have IBS.

  • Answer 1/12

    A doctor will give you a test to see if you have IBS.

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    • Correct Answer:

    A doctor may take some blood to see if something else if causing your symptoms, but a diagnosis of IBS usually comes after other things are ruled out.

  • Question 1/12

    There are __ types of IBS.

  • Answer 1/12

    There are __ types of IBS.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    They are:

    • IBS with constipation (IBS-C)
    • IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D)
    • Mixed IBS (IBS-M)
    • Unsubtyped IBS (IBS-U).

    What kind you have depends on the type and frequency of your stools. Your doctor may use the term "post-infectious IBS" to describe yours, but that refers to the cause of your IBS. It's not its own type.

  • Question 1/12

    Which is more likely to help with IBS symptoms?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which is more likely to help with IBS symptoms?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Fiber can help ease constipation caused by IBS. Conversely, the most common food triggers for IBS are carbs, particularly ones that are hard to digest or absorb, like nuts, dairy, and some beans. Garlic and onion can be a problem, too.

  • Question 1/12

    If you have IBS, you're more likely to get colon cancer.

  • Answer 1/12

    If you have IBS, you're more likely to get colon cancer.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There's no known link between the two conditions.

  • Question 1/12

    For people with IBS, fruits and vegetables can make symptoms worse.

  • Answer 1/12

    For people with IBS, fruits and vegetables can make symptoms worse.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your doctor may use the term FODMAP. That’s the name for types of carbs that everyone's small intestine has trouble with. The gas they produce can make IBS symptoms worse. A registered dietitian can show you which foods may affect you. That way, you don’t have to give up fruits and veggies altogether.

  • Question 1/12

    What percentage of folks with IBS in the U.S. also have celiac disease?

  • Answer 1/12

    What percentage of folks with IBS in the U.S. also have celiac disease?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most Americans with IBS have something called non-celiac wheat intolerance. Proteins or carbohydrates in wheat can cause that. Symptoms of this are similar to celiac disease, and things do get better for people with it when they remove gluten from their diet. But, these folks don't test positive for celiac disease because the reaction caused by non-celiac wheat intolerance is different.

  • Question 1/12

    Food allergies trigger IBS.

  • Answer 1/12

    Food allergies trigger IBS.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Actual food allergies are unusual. Food intolerance, like reactions to some proteins and carbs, is common in people with IBS. In some cases, the expectation that something will have a negative effect produces a reaction. That's called the “nocebo response.”

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Sources | Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat, MPH, MD on March 18, 2019 Medically Reviewed on March 18, 2019

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat, MPH, MD on
March 18, 2019

SOURCES:

UptoDate: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Beyond the Basics)."

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: "Post-Infectious IBS," "The Low FODMAP Diet Approach: Dietary Triggers for IBS Symptoms," "Facts About IBS."

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America: “IBS and IBD: Two Very Different Disorders,” "Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Similarities and Differences."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Definition & Facts for Irritable Bowel Syndrome," "Eating, Diet & Nutrition for Irritable Bowel Syndrome."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Probiotics: In Depth.”

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