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What is the difference between tiredness and fatigue?

ANSWER

Medically speaking, tiredness happens to everyone -- it’s an expected feeling after certain activities or at the end of the day. Usually, you know why you’re tired, and a good night's sleep solves the problem.

Fatigue is a daily lack of energy; unusual or excessive whole-body tiredness not relieved by sleep. It can be acute (lasting a month or less) or chronic (lasting from 1 to 6 months or longer). Fatigue can prevent a person from functioning normally and affects a person's quality of life.

SOURCES: 

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Fatigue."

Cleveland Clinic: "Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis."

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation: "Fighting Fatigue."

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on September 9, 2020

SOURCES: 

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Fatigue."

Cleveland Clinic: "Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis."

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation: "Fighting Fatigue."

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on September 9, 2020

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How many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have fatigue?

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