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What are non prescription treatments that I could try for nerve pain?

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You can try more than just medications to treat your nerve pain. Options include:

  • Acupuncture. It can ease many kinds of pain. Researchers think that acupuncture might release chemicals that numb pain, or that it blocks the pain signals sent from the nerves.
  • Physical therapy. Nerve damage can lead to muscle weakness and wasting. Physical therapy can help reverse that, and lower your pain in the process.
  • Massage. Evidence isn’t clear that massage helps with long-term pain. But it has few risks. Some people find that it can be especially helpful with painful muscle spasms.
  • Assistive devices. Canes, splints, and other devices can make it easier to move around and ease your pain. Depending on your case, ergonomic chairs or desks could also bring relief.
  • Biofeedback. This technique teaches you how to relax your muscles and reduce tension, which may help relieve pain.
  • Hypnosis. There's some evidence that hypnosis can help with various types of long-term pain.
  • Relaxation. Yoga, meditation, or deep breathing may relieve some of the stress caused by life with nerve pain as well as the pain itself.

SOURCES:

American Chronic Pain Association: "Frequently Asked Questions."

FamilyDoctor.org web site: "Diabetic Neuropathy."

Freynhagen, R. BMJ, August 2009.

Medscape Medical News: “Modest Exercise Helps Chronic Pain Patients.”

National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke web site: "Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet."

National Pain Foundation web site: "Neuropathic Pain," "Using Complementary Therapy," “Living with Pain – Reaping the Benefits of Exercise.”

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database web site.

Natural Standard web site.

Weill Cornell Medical College web site: "Neuropathic Pain."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 25, 2020

SOURCES:

American Chronic Pain Association: "Frequently Asked Questions."

FamilyDoctor.org web site: "Diabetic Neuropathy."

Freynhagen, R. BMJ, August 2009.

Medscape Medical News: “Modest Exercise Helps Chronic Pain Patients.”

National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke web site: "Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet."

National Pain Foundation web site: "Neuropathic Pain," "Using Complementary Therapy," “Living with Pain – Reaping the Benefits of Exercise.”

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database web site.

Natural Standard web site.

Weill Cornell Medical College web site: "Neuropathic Pain."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 25, 2020

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