Health and Parenting

Raising fit Kids: Mood

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  • Answer 1/8

    Which is a sign of emotional eating?

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    When stress, anger, or other emotions drive people to eat, they usually don’t go for healthy foods or sensible portions. Craving a specific food, usually a high-calorie treat like pizza or ice cream, is one of the main signs that hunger is more emotional than physical. Emotional hunger also tends to come on fast and makes you eat more than you need. On the other hand, signs that your body really does need food: You’re low on energy, your stomach feels empty, and any number of foods sound good to you.

  • Answer 1/8

    How can you avoid eating your feelings?   

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    Take control of emotional eating by paying attention to what you eat and how you’re feeling when you eat it.  A food diary can help you spot how your mood affects your eating over time, so you can figure out where the problem usually starts. If you tend to eat when you’re bored, then take a walk, call a friend, or find another way to keep yourself busy until the craving passes. And if some foods are just too hard to resist when you’re upset, don’t keep them in your house.

  • Question 1/8

    When you’re in a bad mood, exercise will help you feel better.

  • Answer 1/8

    When you’re in a bad mood, exercise will help you feel better.

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    Stress zaps your energy, which makes it harder to motivate yourself to get up and be active. The catch is that exercise is one of the best ways to beat stress, help you feel calmer, and even sleep better. When your mood is telling you to park it on the couch, try to spend a few minutes moving your body, even if you don’t think you have the energy for an intense workout. Gentle stretches or a walk around the block can help.

  • Question 1/8

    More time on social media can cause more stress.

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    More time on social media can cause more stress.

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    When you’re in a bad mood, you may look for relief in some mindless scrolling online. But that can do you more harm than good. In one survey, people who said they constantly checked social media reported feeling more stress than those who spent less time plugged in. And though 65% said a “digital detox” is good for your mood, just 28% said they actually did it. But you’re in control of those devices. Try putting them away, even for an evening, and seeing how it makes you feel.

  • Answer 1/8

    The point of meditation is to:

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    Meditation is easier than you may think. And even 10 minutes of it can help you feel calmer and recharge your mind. There are lots of ways to do it, such as focusing on how your body feels from head to toe. Some people like to meditate while walking or deep breathing. Even if your mind wanders, your mood can still benefit from a few minutes of this mindfulness. Once you get the hang of it, you can meditate anywhere you like.

  • Question 1/8

    Learning to handle emotions comes naturally to kids. 

  • Answer 1/8

    Learning to handle emotions comes naturally to kids. 

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    Kids aren’t born knowing how to handle their feelings. It’s a skill they have to learn, and parents are often their main teachers. It helps to talk to them about emotions early on. Explain that feelings can be mild or intense and can linger or disappear quickly. And emotions like anger, sadness, and fear are all normal. Help them think of healthy things they can do to get through a bad mood, like moving their body or taking a few minutes to relax. Even better if you model those behaviors yourself when you’re in a bad mood.

  • Question 1/8

    If your child says he doesn’t want to talk about something that’s bothering him, it’s best to:

  • Answer 1/8

    If your child says he doesn’t want to talk about something that’s bothering him, it’s best to:

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    Sometimes you can comfort your child just by being nearby. Ask if he wants to watch a movie, play a game, take a walk, or cook together.

    You can’t force him to open up, but if he does, listen to how he’s feeling and avoid judging and lecturing. If his mood is coming from a problem that needs to be solved, help him brainstorm ways to change his situation. Teach him how to come up with solutions on his own.

  • Question 1/8

    It takes more than positive thinking to shake off a bad mood.  

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    It takes more than positive thinking to shake off a bad mood.  

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    Taking a chance to reflect on the good things in your life is never a bad idea, especially when you’re feeling down. Counting your blessings and practicing gratitude can make you happier today and in the long run. Think of the positive things in your life, big and small. Writing them down in a gratitude journal can help. For an even bigger happiness boost, express appreciation to the people around you, and show kindness to others.

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Great! You don’t let moods derail your family’s healthy choices.   

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    Not bad. You’ve got some tools for managing difficult moods.

    Results:

    Looks like you learned some ways to handle tough emotions. 

Sources | Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on March 08, 2018 Medically Reviewed on March 08, 2018

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on
March 08, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Weight Loss: Gain Control of Emotional Eating,” “Meditation: A Simple, Fast Way to Reduce Stress,” “Weight-loss Basics,” “Stress symptoms: Effects on your body and behavior.”

Michigan State University Extension: “Reconnect with your hunger cues.”

American Psychological Association: “Five Tips To Help Manage Stress,” “Stress and Exercise,” “Stress in America: Coping With Change.”  

Cleveland Clinic: “Five Strategies To Help You Stop Emotional Eating,” “Tis the Season: Eat This, Don’t Stress About That.”

Harvard Medical School: “Adopt Good Sleep Habits,” “Sleep and Mood.”

National Sleep Foundation: “How to Design the Perfect Bedtime Routine.”

TeensHealth/Nemours: “Understanding Your Emotions.”

The Journal of Positive Psychology: “Everyday Creative Activity as a Path to Flourishing.”

KidsHealth/Nemours: “Helping Kids Cope With Stress.”

TeensHealth: “Dealing With Difficult Emotions,” “Three Ways to Practice Gratitude.” “Emotional Eating.”

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: “Counting Blessings Versus Burdens: an Experimental Investigation of Gratitude and Subjective Well-being in Daily Life.”

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