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How is a hair transplant done?

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You usually have the procedure in the doctor's office. First, the surgeon cleans your scalp and injects medicine to numb the back of your head. Your doctor will choose one of two methods for the transplant: follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) or follicular unit extraction (FUE). With FUSS, the surgeon removes a 6- to 10-inch strip of skin from the back of your head. He or she sets it aside and sews the scalp closed. This area is immediately hidden by the hair around it. Next, the surgeon’s team divides the strip of removed scalp into 500 to 2,000 tiny grafts, each with an individual hair or just a few hairs. The number and type of graft you get depends on your hair type, quality, color, and the size of the area where you’re getting the transplant. If you’re getting the FUE procedure, the surgeon’s team will shave the back of your scalp. Then, the doctor will remove hair follicles one by one from there. The area heals with small dots, which your existing hair will cover. After that point, both procedures are the same. After he or she prepares the grafts, the surgeon cleans and numbs the area where the hair will go, creates holes or slits with a scalpel or needle, and delicately places each graft in one of the holes. The surgeon will probably get help from other team members to plant the grafts, too.

From: Hair Transplants: What to Expect WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: "Treating Female Pattern Hair Loss."

MedlinePlus.gov: "Hair Transplant."

Dermatologic Surgery at the University of Washington: "Hair Transplantation."

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on December 7, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: "Treating Female Pattern Hair Loss."

MedlinePlus.gov: "Hair Transplant."

Dermatologic Surgery at the University of Washington: "Hair Transplantation."

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on December 7, 2017

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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