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What are some ways to block or avoid blue light for sleep?

ANSWER

You can minimize the amount of blue light you get. Ways include:

?Wear blue light-blocking glasses. They�re often tinted in amber.

?Cut back on screen time for 2-3 hours before bed.

?Dim your screen to night mode or dark mode.

?Install blue light-filtering apps on your device.

?Change light bulbs. LEDs produce more blue light than fluorescent bulbs.

?Use a dim red lightbulb as a nightlight. Red has the least effect on your circadian rhythm.

?Set an alarm to stop using electronics an hour before you go to bed.

From: How Blue Light Affects Your Sleep WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

University of California, Davis Health: “Is Blue Light from Your Cell Phone, TV Bad for Your Health?”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Should You Be Worried About Blue Light?” and “Should You Use Night Mode to Reduce Blue Light?”

American Optometric Association: “In the Dark on Blue Light?”

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences : “Evening Use of Light-Emitting eReaders Negatively Affects Sleep, Circadian Timing, and Next-Morning Alertness.”

Harvard Health: “Blue Light Has a Dark Side.”

Chronobiology International : “Amber Lenses to Block Blue Light and Improve Sleep.”

Molecular Vision : “Effects of blue Light on the Circadian System and Eye Physiology.”

International Society for Chronobiology : “Amber lenses to block blue light and improve sleep: a randomized trial.”

PLoS One : “Blue-Light Filtering Spectacle Lenses: Optical and Clinical Performances.”

Journal of Psychiatric Research : “Blocking nocturnal blue light for insomnia: A randomized controlled trial.”

Reviewed by Carmelita Swiner on February 19, 2020

SOURCES:

University of California, Davis Health: “Is Blue Light from Your Cell Phone, TV Bad for Your Health?”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Should You Be Worried About Blue Light?” and “Should You Use Night Mode to Reduce Blue Light?”

American Optometric Association: “In the Dark on Blue Light?”

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences : “Evening Use of Light-Emitting eReaders Negatively Affects Sleep, Circadian Timing, and Next-Morning Alertness.”

Harvard Health: “Blue Light Has a Dark Side.”

Chronobiology International : “Amber Lenses to Block Blue Light and Improve Sleep.”

Molecular Vision : “Effects of blue Light on the Circadian System and Eye Physiology.”

International Society for Chronobiology : “Amber lenses to block blue light and improve sleep: a randomized trial.”

PLoS One : “Blue-Light Filtering Spectacle Lenses: Optical and Clinical Performances.”

Journal of Psychiatric Research : “Blocking nocturnal blue light for insomnia: A randomized controlled trial.”

Reviewed by Carmelita Swiner on February 19, 2020

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