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Adult ADHD and Your Relationships

Adult ADHD Treatment and Your Relationships continued...

If you have a spouse or partner, it’s often important for them to be involved in designing and assessing your treatment plan, since they often have a better perspective on which therapies are, or aren’t, working. This can be especially important for gauging whether any ADHD medications you’ve been prescribed, such as Adderall or Concerta, are working.

“It’s a good scenario if someone does have a supportive partner, so they can work together in a positive way to address the disorder,” Safren tells WebMD. “They can make informed decisions about medications and how to work with each other around managing this illness.”

Pera agrees. 

“When you think about it, you have a condition whose characteristics are inattention, poor working memory, and not knowing what’s important. The person with ADHD might think everything is fine, so when they go to therapist there needs to be third-party feedback,” she says.

When it comes to therapy, many experts stress the importance of skills training or coaching to help people with adult ADHD achieve their relationship goals. This might include help developing time management and organizational skills that allow you to manage your obligations and improve your relationships.

As for how much improvement you can expect in your relationships, experts emphasize that each situation is unique.

“Usually, couples can make their lives better and recapture some of the joy and romance that might have gone out of the relationship,” Robin says. But he cautions that the extent of the negative feelings on both sides and the length of time that the relationship has been in negative patterns can have a huge impact on the outcome.

Because of this, it’s best for you and the people you care about to get professional help as soon as you realize adult ADHD may be straining your relationships.

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by David T. Derrer, MD on May 21, 2014

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