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ADHD in Children Health Center

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ADHD in Children: When a Teacher Recognizes ADHD Symptoms

Has your child's teacher let you know that they think your child has ADHD? 

Teachers are often the first ones to recognize or suspect ADHD in children. That's because ADHD symptoms can affect school performance -- and in some cases, disrupt the rest of the class -- and because teachers are with children day in and day out.

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Since teachers work with many different children, they also come to know how students typically behave in classroom situations requiring concentration and self-control. So when they notice something outside the norm, they may speak with the school psychologist or contact the parents about their concerns.

But teachers can't diagnose ADHD. They can tell you what they've noticed, but after that, you would need to get a professional to evaluate your child to see if they have ADHD or if something else is going on.

Because an ADHD diagnosis is based on observations of a child's behavior, the teacher -- and often past teachers -- will play a key role in the process, though. The professional who makes the diagnosis -- usually a specially trained doctor, psychologist, psychiatrist, counselor, or social worker -- will ask your child's teachers to rate their observations of your child's behavior on standardized evaluation scales to compare it to that of other children the same age and gender.  

ADHD Treatment: Coordinating With the School

If your child is diagnosed with ADHD, you'll need to work closely with your child's school. 

The school nurse may play a role in dispensing ADHD medications. Your child's teacher will be important in carrying out the behavioral part of a treatment plan. 

As a parent, you'll need to keep open the lines of communication with the teacher to ensure a consistent system of incentives and discipline between school and home. 

For example, a younger child's teacher may make a checklist and reward the child with a star or smiley face each time he or she completes a certain number of items on the list.

You may have a similar system at home or provide a bigger reward -- such as a special dinner, a family movie night, or an extra hour of TV or computer time -- when your child gets a certain number of stars or smiley faces.

Getting Support for Yourself if Your Child Has ADHD

Your child's teacher can be a good supporter and resource, but you may want more help dealing with the challenges and emotions of parenting a child with ADHD, or with concerns about medications or other issues. 

Read and learn as much as you can about ADHD and its treatment. Other resources include your child's doctor or other professional who diagnosed ADHD, and other parents of children with ADHD.

A national nonprofit organization called Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) also has resources, including support groups for families. The organization's web site lists support groups in your area, and gives information on how to start a group.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Patricia Quinn, MD on September 21, 2012

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