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    Exercise Outdoors -- Even With Allergies

    Here's how to take your workout outside and stay free of allergy symptoms.
    By
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Matthew Hoffman, MD

    With spring nearly upon us, and warmer weather not far behind, you probably can't wait to convert your stuffy indoor fitness routine into breezy outdoor fun. Even if you've never exercised before, adding physical activity to your life can seem a lot more appealing when Mother Nature is your workout partner.

    Unfortunately, if you're one of the tens of thousands who also suffer with seasonal allergies sometimes called "hay fever "just the thought of doing anything in the pollen-rich spring and summer air can set your sneezing, wheezing, runny nose, and itchy watery eyes in motion.

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    If this is the case for you, don't despair. Allergists say you can safely turn your exercise routines "inside-out" -- without sacrificing allergy relief. The first rule of seasonal survival: Avoid activities that increase the impact of a high pollen count.

    "Any exercise that involves a high degree of movement and significantly increases your respiratory rate could cause problems," says Chicago allergist Brian Smart, MD, spokesman for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI).

    That's because the faster you move through air, says Smart, the more airborne pollens and mold spores strike your face, and are inhaled -- and ultimately the greater your chance of an allergic reaction. The activities to avoid -- particularly on days when the pollen count is high and symptoms are flaring -- include running, jogging, biking, or team ball sports.

    "Workouts that are a lot more" allergy friendly" include yoga, swimming, Tai Chi, stretching, weight training -- activities which don't involve a lot of huffing and puffing," says allergist Gillian Shepherd, MD, professor of medicine at Weil Medical College of Cornell University.

    If, in fact, you just can't live without your daily run or bike ride, Smart tells WebMD to plan workouts when pollen counts are at their lowest. Pollen concentrations are usually highest between 5 a.m. and 10 a.m., according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

    Weather Is Key

    The pollen seasons for particular plants are very consistent within each geographical region. Weather plays a large role in determining what the pollen count will be, both seasonally and daily. A change in temperature, wind conditions, humidity, or precipitation can change the pollen counts.

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