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Putting Allergies Out of Work

Have allergies got you falling asleep on the job?
WebMD Feature

Sneezing, wheezing, and too tired to do your job? If you have allergies at work, this probably sounds familiar.

Maybe you’re up all night with miserable allergy symptoms, but you force yourself to go to work anyway. Once there, you’re so fatigued that you got nothing done -- and end up going home early.

Recommended Related to Allergies

Managing Allergies at School

Does your child miss school due to allergies? If so, you're not alone. Seasonal allergies are believed to affect as many as 40% of U.S. children. On any given day, about 10,000 of those children miss school because of their allergies. That's a total of more than 2 million lost school days every year. Even if your child doesn't miss school, allergies can get in the way of a productive school day, so managing allergies at school is an important part of caring for your child's health.

Read the Managing Allergies at School article > >

Maybe your allergy medications knock you out. Sure, they control your allergy symptoms, but they also zap your energy and make you inattentive on the job.

Or maybe something at work is kicking your allergies into high gear. Once you walk in the door, you can feel them getting worse.

Taking Control of Allergies at Work: Where to Start

You don’t have to let allergies make you miserable at work. You can manage allergy symptoms and improve your concentration by following these three steps:

  • Understand the problem of allergies at work
  • Identify workplace allergy triggers
  • Find the best allergy medicine

Stress and Work Allergies

Many patients complain of increased allergies when there’s high stress at work, says Gailen Marshall, MD, PhD, director of the division of clinical immunology and allergy at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson.

People often think the allergy trigger is a work-related exposure. But Marshall tells WebMD that stress from work deadlines, conflicts with co-workers, and long hours can all increase allergy symptoms.

Feeling Too Tired to Work

If your allergies make you feel exhausted at work, the reason why may be more than just a bad night’s sleep.

“Blame your overactive immune system,” says Greg Martin, MD, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary, allergy and critical care at Emory University in Atlanta. Persistent, ongoing activation of the immune system triggers chronic inflammation, and this causes fatigue, Martin tells WebMD. Here’s how it works:

  • Allergies are characterized by inflammation
  • Inflammation produces substances called cytokines
  • Cytokines move from our nose through the bloodstream and into our brain, causing allergy symptoms that tell us we are sick

In fact, Marshall says that fatigue is a key symptom of allergies. When allergies are poorly treated, you also get symptoms such as nasal congestion and snoring that can ruin sleep, he says.

Next Article:

What Helps Your Allergies Most?