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    Understanding Arthritis -- Diagnosis & Treatment

    How Is Arthritis Diagnosed?

    A diagnosis of arthritis is the first step toward successful treatment. To diagnose arthritis, your doctor will consider your symptoms, perform a physical exam to check for swollen joints or loss of motion, and use blood tests and X-rays to confirm the diagnosis. X-rays and blood tests also help distinguish the type of arthritis you have. For example, most people with rheumatoid arthritis have antibodies called rheumatoid factors (RF) in their blood, although RF may also be present in other disorders.

    X-rays are used to diagnose osteoarthritis, typically revealing a loss of cartilage, bone spurs, and in extreme cases, bone rubbing against bone. Sometimes, joint aspiration (using a needle to draw a small sample of fluid from the joint for testing) is used to rule out other types of arthritis. If your doctor suspects infectious arthritis as a complication of some other disease, testing a sample of fluid from the affected joint will usually confirm the diagnosis and determine how it will be treated.

    Understanding Arthritis

    Find out more about arthritis:

    Basics

    Symptoms

    Diagnosis and Treatment

    How Is Arthritis Treated?

    Treatment of arthritis generally includes rest, occupational or physical therapy, exercise, drugs, and sometimes surgery to correct joint damage.

    Treatments for osteoarthritis generally can help relieve pain and stiffness, but the disease may continue to progress. The same was true for rheumatoid arthritis in the past, but newer treatments for rheumatoid arthritis have been able to slow or stop the progression of arthritis damage.

     

    Arthritis Treatment: Occupational Therapy

    Protecting your joints is an important part of arthritis treatment. With the help of an occupational therapist, you can learn easier ways to do your normal activities. An occupational therapist can teach you how to:

    • Avoid positions that strain your joints
    • Use your strongest joints and muscles while sparing weaker ones
    • Provide braces or supports to protect certain joints
    • Use grab bars in the bath
    • Use modified doorknobs, canes, or walkers
    • Use devices to help you with tasks such as opening jars or pulling up socks and zippers

    Arthritis Treatment: Medicine

    Arthritis treatment will depend on the nature and seriousness of the underlying condition. The main goals are to reduce inflammation and improve the function of affected joints before more serious problems occur.

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