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    Asthma Risk Factors

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    There are usually reasons or risk factors that predispose you to asthma and respiratory problems. Asthma can happen to anyone without any risk factors, but it is less likely if there are no risk factors present.

    Let's look at some asthma risk factors and see how they increase the chance that a person will have the asthma symptoms of cough, wheezing, and shortness of breath associated with the disease. After determining your personal risk factors for asthma, decide on the ones you can control and try to make some lifestyle changes. Avoidance of the risk factors you can control is crucial in preventing asthma symptoms. While you cannot change your gender or family history, you can avoid smoking with asthma, breathing polluted air, allergens, and taking care of your general health so you don't become overweight. Take control of your asthma -- by controlling your asthma risk factors. By understanding all the risk factors, you may be able to prevent or control your asthma.

    Recommended Related to Asthma

    Asthma in Children and Infants

    Not all children have the same asthma symptoms, and these symptoms can vary from episode to episode in the same child. Possible signs and symptoms of asthma in children include: Frequent coughing spells, which may occur during play, at night, or while laughing or crying A chronic cough (which may be the only symptom) Less energy during play Rapid breathing (intermittently) Complaint of chest tightness or chest "hurting" Whistling sound when breathing in or out -- called wheezing...

    Read the Asthma in Children and Infants article > >

    Gender and Asthma

    Childhood asthma occurs more frequently in boys than in girls. It's unknown why this occurs, although some experts find a young male's airway size is smaller when compared to the female's airway, which may contribute to increased risk of wheezing after a cold or other viral infection. Around age 20, the ratio of asthma between men and women is the same. At age 40, more females than males have adult asthma.

    Family History of Asthma

    Blame Mom or Dad or both for your asthma. Your inherited genetic makeup predisposes you to having asthma. In fact, it's thought that three-fifths of all asthma cases are hereditary. According to a CDC report, if a person has a parent with asthma, he or she is three to six times more likely to develop asthma than someone who does not have a parent with asthma.

    Atopy and Asthma

    Atopy refers to a genetic tendency to develop eczema (atopic dermatitis), allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and asthma. Atopy causes a heightened sensitivity to common allergens, especially those that are in food and in the air.

    Some children with eczema or atopic dermatitis develop asthma. Some findings indicate that children with atopic dermatitis may have more severe and persistent asthma as adults.

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