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Asthma Health Center

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Asthma Tests

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There are some key asthma tests your doctor will use in diagnosing asthma. Some asthma tests, such as lung (or pulmonary) function tests, measure lung function. Other asthma tests can help determine if you are allergic to specific foods, pollen, or other particles. Blood tests give a picture of your overall health; specific tests also measure levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), a key antibody that’s released during an allergic reaction. While everyone makes IgE, people who have allergies make larger quantities of this protective protein.

All of these asthma tests help your doctor determine if asthma is indeed present and if there are other coexisting conditions with asthma, such as allergies, GERD, or sinusitis. Once a proper asthma diagnosis is made, specific asthma medications can be prescribed to help manage your asthma and prevent asthma attacks.

Recommended Related to Asthma

Treating Asthma in Children

The goals of asthma therapy are: To prevent your child from having chronic and troublesome symptoms To maintain your child's lung function as close to normal as possible To allow your child to maintain normal physical activity levels (including exercise) To prevent recurrent asthma attacks and to reduce the need for emergency department visits or hospitalizations To provide medications to your child that give the best results with the fewest side effects Medications that are available...

Read the Treating Asthma in Children article > >

Lung Function Tests

Lung function tests are asthma tests that assess lung function. The two most common lung function tests used to diagnose asthma are spirometry and methacholine challenge tests.

Spirometry is a simple breathing test that measures how much and how fast you can blow air out of your lungs. It is often used to determine the amount of airway obstruction you have. The methacholine challenge test may be performed if your symptoms and screening spirometry do not clearly or convincingly establish a diagnosis of asthma. Your doctor will know which test is best for your situation.

Chest X-Ray

While a chest X-ray is not an asthma test, it may be used to make sure nothing else is causing your asthma symptoms. An X-ray is an image of the body that is created by using low doses of radiation to see internally. X-rays can be used to diagnose a wide range of conditions, from bronchitis to a broken bone. Your doctor may perform an X-ray exam on you in order to see the structures inside your chest, including the heart, lungs, and bones. By viewing your lungs, your doctor can see if asthma is likely to be causing your symptoms.

Evaluation for Heartburn and GERD

Gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly called GERD, is another condition that may worsen asthma. If your doctor suspects this problem, he or she may recommend specific tests to look for it.

For more detail, see WebMD's article on Heartburn and Asthma.

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